Tag Archive: teensavers home drug test kits


Teensavers wants to salute a teen that is talking about something that many teens want hidden.

But one is telling it like it is. He says forget the paperwork that says that his school is a clean school and that random searches of students are effective.

DON’T GUESS IF YOUR TEEN IS CLEAN. THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT PROVIDES ANSWERS FOR YOUR FAMILY IN LESS THAN 5 MINUTES. FROM POT TO PRESCRIPTION DRUGS, GET A CLEAR PICTURE OF YOUR TEEN’S HEALTH. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.

Christopher Steil, 17, a junior at Minnechaug Regional High in Wilbraham, MA, says that drugs are everywhere.

He tells Masslive.com that the amount of drugs available to kids there is unbelievable, and that students can score marijuana, cocaine, LSD, and ecstasy.

Steil says that the drugs are sold in parks and bathrooms on campus, and that kids know to keep drugs out of their lockers and cars, instead carrying them in their pockets and backpacks.

One quote that was telling was that Steil says prior to attending Minnechaug Regional in 09, he had not heard of half the drugs being sold on campus. Now he says, “I am surrounded by them.”

School officials dispute Steil’s claims, and other students say that the drug problem at that campus is no different than drug issues at other schools.

For the complete store on masslive.com click HERE.

This is the time for all parents of high schoolers to consider the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

The kit can screen for popular drugs like heroin and marijuana. It can also detect ecstasy and cocaine. More importantly it can tell if your teen is abusing prescription drugs, which are now the second most preferred drugs by teens to marijuana.

 

A new report released this week states that more of our seniors are abusing prescription drugs.

The main reason is that the baby boomer generation is more likely to use drugs than the generation that preceded them.

YOU CAN’T SMELL FOR OPIATES LIKE YOU CAN FOR ALCOHOL AND MARIJUANA. DON’T LET YOUR TEEN’S ADDICTION SLIP BY YOUR NOSE. TEENSAVERS 5, 7, AND 12 PANEL DRUG TESTS DETECT THE MOST POPULAR DRUGS. CLICK HERE TO SEE WHICH HOME DRUG TEST IS BEST FOR YOUR FAMILY.

Of course, more teens are using pills too. It’s now not uncommon to see drug busts featuring grandparent and grandchildren using together, selling together, or both.

If you think prescription drug abuse isn’t a problem in our society. Please open your eyes.

Here’s the latest study regarding senior prescription abuse.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health, the numbers of older substance abusers could continue to rise, due to the aging of the baby boomers, who were more likely than previous generations to have used in their youth.

Medications for a variety of conditions can help older adults maintain health and function, and most older adults take their medications as prescribed. At the same time, abuse of prescription medications — such as painkillers and depressants — and illicit drugs — such as marijuana and cocaine — can be especially harmful for older adults because aging changes how the body and brain handle these substances. “As people get older, it is more difficult for their bodies to absorb and break down medications and drugs,” says Dr. Nora Volkow, director of NIDA. “Abusing these substances can worsen age-related health conditions, cause injuries and lead to addiction.”

Although substance abuse among older adults is preventable and treatable, many older adults may not get the help they need because some common warning signs of abuse, such as sleep problems, falls, and depression, can also be signs of other health conditions. The new topic on NIHSeniorHealth provides tips on behaviors to watch for and appropriate steps to take if a substance abuse problem is suspected. “This topic is an excellent, easy-to-understand overview of a growing problem,” says Dr. Volkow. “It’s a must-read for anyone concerned about in themselves, an older relative or friend.”

Prescription and Illicit is the latest topic to appear on NIHSeniorHealth, joining a roster of nearly 60 research-based health topics of interest to older adults, including exercise and physical activity, safe use of medicines and management of diseases such as stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease. A joint effort of the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine at NIH, NIHSeniorHealth has senior-friendly features such as large print and opened-captioned videos to make the information on the site easy for older adults to see, understand and navigate. Recently redesigned for today’s , NIHSeniorHealth now features a search function that offers users access to an even broader selection of senior-related information.

More information: http://nihseniorhealth.gov/

Provided by National Institutes of Health search and more info website

If you have a substance abuse problem, please consult your doctor.

 

Teensavers came across the release from Tufts University which points out why parents need to monitor what their kids do and how they can help them make better choices.

MARIJUANA SMOKING ISN’T A RITE OF PASSAGE FOR TEENS. AND WHILE NEARLY 30% OF TEENS SMOKE POT, MANY THINK IT’S SAFE AND SHOULD BE LEGAL. DON’T LET YOUR TEEN FALL INTO THIS TRAP AND HARM NOT ONLY THEIR FUTURE, BUT PERHAPS THEIR CHILDREN’S FUTURE. CLICK HERE FOR THE ACCURATE AND RELIABLE ANSWER TO TEEN DRUG EXPERIMENTATION.

Here is the press release from Tufts University.

Mothers who use marijuana as teens—long before having children—may put their future children at a higher risk of drug abuse, new research suggests.

Researchers in the Neuroscience and Reproductive Biology section at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine conducted a study to determine the transgenerational effects of cannabinoid exposure in adolescent female rats. For three days, adolescent rats were administered the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55, 212-2, a drug that has similar effects in the brain as THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. After this brief exposure, they remained untreated until being mated in adulthood.

The male offspring of the female rats were then measured against a control group for a preference between chambers that were paired with either saline or morphine. The rats with mothers who had adolescent exposure to WIN-55,212-2 were significantly more likely to opt for the morphine-paired chamber than those with mothers who abstained. The results suggest that these animals had an increased preference for opiate drugs.

The study was published in the Journal of Psychopharmocology and funded by the National Institutes of Health.

“Our main interest lies in determining whether substances commonly used during adolescence can induce behavioral and neurochemical changes that may then influence the development of future generations,” said Research Assistant Professor John J. Byrnes, the study’s lead author, “We acknowledge that we are using rodent models, which may not fully translate to the human condition. Nevertheless, the results suggest that maternal drug use, even prior to pregnancy, can impact future offspring.”

Byrnes added that much research is needed before a definitive connection is made between adolescent drug use and possible effects on future children.

The study builds on earlier findings by the Tufts group, most notably a study published last year in Behavioral Brain Research by Assistant Professor Elizabeth Byrnes that morphine use as adolescent rats induces changes similar to those observed in the present study.

Other investigators in the field have previously reported that cannabinoid exposure during pregnancy (in both rats and humans) can affect offspring development, including impairment of cognitive function, and increased risk of depression and anxiety.

Byrnes JJ, Johnson NL, Schenk ME, Byrnes EM. Cannabinoid exposure in adolescent female rats induces transgenerational effects on morphine conditioned place preference in male offspring [published online ahead of print April 15 2012]. J Psychopharmacol, 2012. DOI: 10.1177/0269881112443745

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About the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University

Founded in 1978 in North Grafton, Mass., Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University is internationally esteemed for academic programs that impact society and the practice of veterinary medicine; three hospitals and two clinics that combined log more than 80,000 animal cases each year; and groundbreaking research that benefits animal, public, and environmental health.

Came across a wonderful story out of Olive Hill, Kentucky from WSAZ.

NEED A HOME DRUG TEST KIT FOR SOMEONE AT YOUR SCHOOL OR SOMEONE IN YOUR FAMILY? CLICK HERE.

Kids actually were supporting a program that advocates drug testing in school and in the home. And for those who participate by being tested at school, or having their parents test them, the kids receive a t-shirt that they can proudly wear that says “Screened and Clean.”

Here’s what the students had to say:

“If there’s a party and kids are tempted to do drugs, and the parents might test them when they get home, they’ll think twice,” –student Morgan McGlone

“It will help the relationship between parents and kids. Because too many kids think they can get away with it – and they shouldn’t get away with it.” –student Sarah Crum

“If the parents are using drugs, I would say, ‘If you test me, then I should be able to test you,’ so it’s fair for one or the other,” –student Kansas Cox

We often encounter resistance about home drug testing, and many times, it’s the parents making up the most excuses. On top of it, they rarely discuss drugs and the anti-drug message at home with their children. It’s one of the leading reasons why 2,500 children try drugs for the first time every day.

This screen and clean program sets a great example, and like one student said, if the popular kids are wearing the shirts, maybe more kids will want to hop on the bandwagon!

There are several myths when it comes to teens and drugs.

SOMETIMES JUST HAVING A HOME DRUG TEST IN THE HOUSE CAN INSPIRE KIDS TO TELL THEIR FRIENDS “I CAN’T TRY DRUGS.  MY PARENTS TEST ME.”   CLICK HERE FOR TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS.

Myth #1: NOT MY KID!

You don’t have to be in the treatment and recovery field to have heard this phrase uttered a few dozen times by parents.    It’s pretty common knowledge that parents simply do not believe that their child could ever do drugs.     Truth is, nobody’s child is 100% safe.    It takes not only strong values from the child, but it also takes repeated reinforcement from parents.

Myth #2: I COULD TELL IF MY SON OR DAUGHTER WAS USING DRUGS!

We all have some sort of visual of what a junkie looks like.   And despite never wanting to see any of our children in that state, we pretty much have a picture of what a ragged junked-out version of our kids would resemble.    Of course if your once healthy teen now appears thin, pale, and weak, a parent might speculate that there is something more than diet that is the issue.    But drug detection is mostly invisible to the naked eye.  Sure, there are some signs to look for.   But a parent is typically not a treatment professional.   And the occasional user may not reveal any long-term signs of abuse.    Typically, a parent will only notice drug use, when it has become habitual, or abusive.    They have a much better chance of finding their child’s stash of substances, than detecting that their child may be abusing something.

Myth #2: I KNOW WHAT DRUGGIES LOOK LIKE: DISHEVELED LOSERS!

Not exactly.   There is no poster child for drug abuse.   Teen drug use is not confined to kids from a certain ethnicity, community, or social upbringing.   There are no social barriers for teen drug use.   They are not always the outcasts at school, suffering from bad grades, and completely unsocial.    We are seeing straight A students, star athletes, social butterflies on campus all falling victim to drug abuse.     Drug abuse is not a problem solely with the lower classes.   And it isn’t a problem solely in high society circles.   Kids abuse drugs for many reason.  They could be enjoying drugs recreationaly, or taking them to cope with stress.   They key isn’t why they are using, it is how to stop them from using.

You can tell when you read online stories from major TV and newspaper media outlets just how disillusioned society is about teen drug use.

Many people will make ignorant comments, not knowing anything about these victims.   That’s exactly what they are, victims.

The latest victim was Glen Berlin Parrish.   He’s the 18-year-old who was found dead at UCLA on Sunday morning.   Parents and the boy’s family speculate that the teen may have mixed alcohol with prescription drugs.   An autopsy will help determine the toxicology results.

The father, Glen Parrish, told the Contra Costa Times that “there were a lot of drugs taken and a lot of drinking” at the party attended by his son.

Heartbreaking words from the elder Parrish, as he told the Times, “he was an amazing child with a huge bright future – 3.9 grade point average. And he’s gone.”

While police investigate what exactly happened at the party, what the boy took, and how he got his hands on potentially lethal narcotics, the family is left planning a funeral for a kid who had just gotten a job, was a stellar student, and a former football player.

There’s no such thing as a good child or a bad child.   There isn’t one “I gotta keep my eye on.”  Parents often single out the one child in the family who may consider doing drugs.    Instead parents should focus on drug testing all of their children, to make sure this doesn’t happen to any of their loved ones.