Tag Archive: teens


We want to remind all of our loyal readers that visit this page for information that we now are running our blog on our own hosted wordpress site Teenhomedrugtest.com.

Please stop by for our Daily 7 Panel and to catch up on all of the latest teen drug trends and home drug test answers.

Advertisements

Parents looking for answers filled the seats of First Christian Church in Huntington Beach last night, as the Huntington Beach Union High School District offered a drug talk.

The program was held in the wake of the overdose of 18-year-old Tyler Macleod.

The first speaker was Senior Pastor Bruce Templeton, who opened the event with a few heartfelt words.

Next to speak was the Superintendent of SBUHSD schools, Dr. Greg Plutko.

The Dr. Bill Beacham took the stage and began to discuss how and when teens turn to drugs.

He reported that the average age of teens trying alcohol or drugs is now 14 years old, and the concern is that at that age, the use of substances will alter the brain.

Beacham gave three destinations for teens who abuse drugs. They will either end up in treatment, jail, or the morgue.

Dr. Bill Beacham discusses the phases of chemical dependency before a crowd of parents at the First Christian Church in Huntington Beach.

He explained that kids get sicker quicker, that the prefrontal cortex isn’t really developed until a human is 19-20 years old.

Dr. Beacham covered the phases of susbtance dependency and how like a concussion, the prefrontal cortex needs 6 to 9 months to heal from substance abuse.

He explained that “hangover” is a glamorized term for overdose, and that you see the changes in a teen through the phases of chemical dependency.

Kids set rules about their drug use. It begins as experimentation. Then they begin to bend the rules, using at school when they vowed they never would. Ultimately, kids lose their rules altogether, as the substance abuse controls them and dictates their need to abuse drugs constantly.

He discussed a weapon for parents to detect the teen experimentation: the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.  For information on the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit

Dr. Bill Beacham holds up a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit to parents and explains how the 12-panel test gives parents instant results for up to 12 different substance classifications.

Dr. Beacham then told parents that addicts, especially teen addicts will resort to three behaviors to mask their addiction.

Denial: They refuse to acknowledge that they are abusing a substance.

Minimization: They believe that their use is under control and not a problem in their life.

Projection: They blame others for their downfalls, and blame others for blowing their addiction out of proportion.

Dr. Beacham closed the session with models of prevention for parents.

He said the kids need to have a tool kit and they come in a series of steps:

Dr. Bill Beacham discusses his steps to empower parents at a community anti-drug meeting held Monday, October 29th at the First Christian Church of Huntington Beach.

One of the key elements that Beacham believes will help the community is with an anti-drug coalition involving faith, law enforcement, school, and families.

Beacham referred to coalitions making an impact in other communities, and how they’ve helped develop laws like social hosting ordinances which will cost parents fines for allowing teen parties at their homes.

The message was well received, and hopefully Huntington Beach takes more strides against teen and youth drug abuse.

There is one place parents can get answers, and that’s Saturday November 3rd at Edison High School. Parents and students can get information at Real, and event sponsored by parents in Huntington Beach.

REAL, an event held this Saturday at Edison High School.

Teensavers is proud to be part of a program that was created by Phelps County, Missouri leaders, including the Sheriff, and prosecutor.

Here is their press release

  • In the two months that local law enforcement agencies began offering free drug testing kits in Phelps County, a total of 120 kits have been distributed to parents.Both the Rolla Police Department and Phelps County Sheriff’s Department began offering the kits Aug. 13.“If 120 test kits go out and 120 kids are protected, it would be a success, but because of the confidentiality of the program, we don’t know what happened,” said Sgt. Andy Davis, of the sheriff’s office.

    “It gives a reason for a child to say no (to drugs) if they know, “I will possibly be drug tested by my parents,’ ” said Rolla Police Chief Mark Kearse.

    Both Davis and Kearse said they did not know how many kits they expected to give away through the program.

    The program was started as an effort to curb drug abuse among youth and is being supported by the sheriff’s office, Rolla police department and the county prosecutor’s office.

    The program is strictly voluntary. To qualify for the Teensavers kits, people simply need to be a resident anywhere in Phelps County and have at least one child who is 17 years old or younger.

    The kits were purchased with drug seizure funds. No taxpayer funds were used.

    Each kit comes with a urine test container, instructions, parental support guide, self-addressed mailing container and confidential identification number.

    The confidential number, guide and test container come sealed in a tamper proof pouch so only the parent who opens it has access to those items, guaranteeing the child and test results are only accessible to the parent. The parent is in full control.

    The kits test for 12 substances — THC (marijuana), cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, opiates, PCP, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, methadone, oxycodone, MDMA and tricyclic antidepressants.

    These drugs can be detected with a urine test when they have been in the body for two or three days or up to two weeks depending on the type of drug.

    The kits are easy to use and easy to read, offer confidential results and 24/7 support and have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

    The kits come with a small shipping box to mail the sample off to a laboratory, which can confirm the preliminary results. The lab only has the identification number and has no idea who the sample belongs to. Parents can check the results of the lab’s test online or by phone.

    Law enforcement do not know the results and no tests take place at the sheriff’s office or police department.

    For questions about the kits, people may contact Cpl. Mike Kirn at 573-426-3860 or Lt. James Macormic at 573-308-1213.

     

Students aren’t afraid to talk about their choices to use alcohol, cigarettes, and drugs.

Nearly 7% of high schoolers abuse one of the three substances during the school day, according to Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

Their peers aren’t surprise. 86% of teens polled in a phone interview said they know a classmate that’s abusing drugs during the day.

The findings were released in the center’s annual back to school survey.

 

Nearly half the students say they know someone who deals drugs at school, and 6 out of 10 say that drugs are easy to obtain on campus.

The top four drugs commonly abused according to the survey were marijuana, prescription drugs, cocaine, and ecstasy.

IS YOUR TEEN ONE OF THE KIDS ON CAMPUS KNOWN FOR USING OR SELLING DRUGS? CLICK HERE TO GET THE ACCURATE TEST TO DETERMINE WHETHER THEY ARE USING DRUGS.

Peer Pressure is a big factor.

The survey indicates that more teens are seeing imagery, thanks to social media, that entices them to drink. The teens say they are encouraged to party after seeing photos and videos of classmates drinking, high, or passed out.

This is a reason why parents need to be as involved in their child’s social media, as their child is. Kids do not fear posting comments about alcohol or marijuana on facebook or twitter.

It’s everywhere.

And parents who think this problem is pervasive in the public school system better open their eyes.

The survey indicates that private schools also have a massive drug problem, and it is rising dramatically.

In 2011, 36% of private school students said their school was “drug-infected.”

Fast forward a year, and that figure is now 54%, a 50-percent gain year to year.

Teen drug use appears to be a very obvious case of monkey see, monkey do.

Teens are more likely to use drugs when their parents either use, or are laid back regarding drugs, tobacco, and alcohol.

Teens who say they’ve been left alone overnight – almost 30% of those surveyed – are about twice as likely to have used alcohol or marijuana and almost three times more likely to have tried tobacco than teens who’ve never been left alone at night.

If there ever was a time for parents to get more involved with their teens, now is that time.

Parents need to be aware of what their children are doing.

They also have access to tools like the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit that can help detect this drug use.

Catching it early, can make the difference between teens who experiment, and teens who become addicts.

For more information on the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit, and where you can find one for your family, CLICK HERE.

New Jersey 101.5 Radio station is airing a 5 part series all this week on the teen drug crisis in that state.

DETECT TEEN DRUG USE WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT. CLICK HERE TO SEE WHICH COMBINATION IS BEST FOR YOUR FAMILY. THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT STARTS WORKING THE MINUTE YOU BRING IT HOME.

And while you may not live in New Jersey, the numbers will open your eyes to the problem that is growing in America.

You can read the first installment of the series from Stacy Proebstle by clicking HERE.

 

Addicts are generally the same.

But their stories are very different.

They may have arrived at the same place, but they took many roads to get there.

I wanted you to read this story of a woman’s transition into drugs.

You can read the first person account from the Madeleine Brand show by clicking here.

If you are screening for marijuana, Teensavers is the choice for families at all Rite Aid locations.

A 3-panel test also checks for cocaine and methamphetamines.

If you know a loved one who needs to be drug tested, the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit is the right test for you.

Olympic fever is about to sweep across the globe.

The Unites States women’s soccer team kicks off it’s run for a gold medal Wednesday morning.

These world class athletes should be admired for their dedication to health and fitness, and their commitment to a a drug free life style.

The arrival of the Summer Olympic Games presents parents with the perfect time to discuss teen drug use.

This is a time, when the family sits around to watch some of their favorite sports like swimming, gymnastics, and track and field.

Parents can point out to their children, regardless if they are 8 or 18-years-old, that these athletes are the result of living a life dedicated to being drug-free, and focusing on grueling exercise and very healthy diet.

All of these athletes you see during the two week period undergo multiples drug screens.

Maybe it’s time parents pledge to help keep their children drug free with the gold medal of home drug testing, the Teensavers Home Drug Test kit.

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit was made specifically for families, and the kits drug testing combinations are set to treatment trends. Buy the right test for your teen, the 3-panel, 5-panel, and 7-panel drug test detect the popular drug choices for teens.

The 7-panel drug test is the most comprehensive drug test for families.

It tests for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, opiates, oxycodone, and benzodiazepines.

For a list of the retailers that carry the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit, click here.

The people at Teensavers bring you stories about drugs affecting the community.     We’ve seen an explosion in prescription drug and heroin use the last several years.

Recently, the Chicago Sun-Times has been consistently reporting on the epidemic going in Illinois, and the drug dealings along the so-called heroin highway.

Heroin can be found in nearly every community.

Is it as readily available as marijuana? Of course not.

But it can be found, if a person makes an even half hearted attempt.

Heroin users aren’t bad people. They are people who typically get hooked on prescription drugs. Nobody wakes up and says, “I’m going to try heroin today.”

Heroin use comes as a need. Addicts, hooked on opioids, are desperate to continue their fix, but they often cannot afford 10, 25, 100 pills a day.

DON’T GET CAUGHT OFF GUARD. DETECT TEEN DRUG EXPERIMENTATION BEFORE IT BECOMES ADDICTION. THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST PROVIDES FAMILIES IMMEDIATE ANSWERS. CLICK HERE TO SEE WHICH TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT IS RIGHT FOR YOUR LOVED ONES.

Families need to realize that prescription drugs, medications that can be found in almost every home, are the gateway to heroin.

There is no other direct link to drug use as closely associated as painkillers are to heroin.

To read the story of Bill Patrianakos in the Chicago Sun-Times, click here.

Teensavers wanted to alert you to a heartbreaking story this morning in the Daily Herald that hopefully will open your eyes to the growing teen and young adult drug problem here in America.

Chelsea Laliberte’s reveals her struggle with her brother’s addiction, and it how it spiraled out of control until it took his life.

DON’T LOSE A CHILD THINKING THEY ARE DRUG FREE, OR ASSUMING THEY ARE ONLY USING ALCOHOL AND MARIJUANA. DEATH IS NOT A PLEASANT SURPRISE. CLICK HERE FOR THE TOTAL SOLUTION FOR YOUR FAMILY.

She made desperate pleas to her family that her brother Alex was using more than alcohol and marijuana. They didn’t listen.

Now she’s on a mission to alert parents about the growing heroin problem in the suburbs and how listening to siblings can make a big difference.

Siblings can be key in catching experimentation before it becomes addiction. There are many who won’t speak up, but the ones who do, should be listened to.

A recent study shows that alcohol is more of a gateway drug than marijuana, which is very troubling. Numerous teens drink and many parents dismiss it as a rite of passage.

But when drinking at 13 or 14, evolves into marijuana use at 14 and 15, teens often begin to get curious about other substances before they even graduate high school.

Parents need to have frequent conversations with their teens about all kinds of drugs, from alcohol and mairjuana, to cocaine and heroin. Kids are abusing pills, and once addicted to opiates, the often turn to heroin.

Some use amphetamines or methamphetamine to get that high, and others use club drugs like ecstasy, thinking it’s a safer alternative to alcohol.

Teensavers Home drug Tests can detect all of these substances up to 72 hours. Parents would be wise to keep one on hand.

It empowers teens to say no, when asked by their friends to do drugs.   40% say they try for the first time, because they didn’t know how to reject the peer pressure.