Tag Archive: Parent


A reminder to everyone that is looking for new on the latest teen drug trends or information on home drug testing, which drugs can be tested for, and how home drug test works, I want to remind people that our content has moved to a new location.

We are now blogging at www.teenhomedrugtest.com

We will have even better content and information on marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, opiates, benzodiazepines, PCP, methamphetamine, amphetamines, oxycodone, tricyclic antidepressants, barbiturates and methadone.

We also will be able to bring you discounts on home drug test kits, and we will be better served to answer your questions.

So please, if you follow our blog and subscribe to our updates here or on facebook or twitter, we ask that you please come over and subscribe, comments, and LIKE our comments at www.teenhomedrugtest.com.

Thank you!

 

We are growing and we are taking the leap to our own hosted blog.

We encourage all of our followers over at our new blog.

 

Teenhomedrugtest.com

You will still get the same content, up to the minute drug information and answers to drug test questions.

We will be bringing more community new, and discussing the latest trends in teen drug use.

We hope if you’ve followed us here, that you will come over to our new site.

We appreciate everyone that has visited, read our posts, and commented.

We’ve been glad to help numerous families and now we aim to make the experience that much better!

Again, the link for the new page is right HERE.

 

We have talked many times about parents relying on the smell test at the end of a Friday or Saturday night.

They encounter their teen as their teen comes home around curfew, and they engage them in a small conversation, give them a hug and a kiss, and say good night.

What they’ve also been doing during that brief minute or two exchange is sniff, sniff, sniff.

Parents believe that the easiest thing to do at the end of the night is to give their teen a look over, and then see if they can detect any smell of cigarettes, alcohol, or drugs.

But sometimes the nose won’t detect any odor, but instinct is telling parents that something isn’t right.

What next?

In the world of drug use and detection, the “break glass in case of emergency” tool is the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

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The Teensavers kit is the next level of detection.

Instinct can be a big factor for parents. Their teen may not be stumbling around or incoherent, but there’s enough there to suspect that something isn’t quite right.

Within three minutes you will have your answer.

1 panel tests screen for marijuana (THC)

3 panel tests screen for marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine

5 panel tests screen for the above three plus opiates and oxycodone

7 panel tests screen for the previous 5 plus benzodiazepines and ecstasy

12 panel tests screen for the previous 7 plus amphetamines, barbiturates, methadone, PCP, and tricyclic antidepressants.

Adderall has been a big helper to people coping with ADHD.  This includes children diagnosed with the condition.

But adderall is also one drug that is frequently misused by people of all ages.

The Seattle Times’ Larry Stone takes a look at how it is popular in professional sports as a performance enhancer.

Teens also abuse it as a study enhancer.

In a recent anti drug coalition meeting in Orange County, California, several teens were in attendance.

They were asked about kids using adderall and other so called “study drugs.”

Several admitted that they know of use on campus by their peers.

Moms and dads have an ally against drug abuse. Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits detect adderall and other amphetamines that

We used to see an explosion of this in college, as students were trying to keep up between midterms and papers.

But high schoolers are now looking for that competitive edge, as they know they kid sitting in the desk across the aisle could be gunning for the spot at their preferred college.

Most parents don’t realize that a drug like adderall needs to be monitored for when it comes to trying to prevent or detect teen drug use.

Too many parents focus on their nose as the detection agent for marijuana and alcohol.

But many popular drugs of abuse can’t be smelled by the nose.

Parents also cannot be naive to think that because their student is a straight A student or takes AP classes that they are drug free.

There are many kids with a 4.0 GPA that have overdosed on drugs.

If you’re a parent of a teen who is prescribed adderall by the family doctor, make sure they take their dosage as recommended.

That means despite the fact that Johnny or Mary are now 17 and 18 years old, you know how many pills are in the bottle at all times, and you watch them take it.

Kids with prescriptions can take it haphazardly, trying to get by without it at times, so that they can abuse it later.

Many kids sell or trade their medications for money and/or other drugs.

If you are a parent and you see your child acting a little strange come finals time, don’t just immediately assume it to be stress related.

There may be other factors involved.

America’s Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman, says that more kids are abusing study drugs because they are just trying to keep up with the other guy. He says it’s akin to athletes doping to keep up with competitors.

It’s a reminder that the drug debate, needs to include substances like study helpers, relaxers, and sleeping aids.

There’s no doubt parents will have a ton on their plates this week before they pack on the pounds form their Thanksgiving feasts this holiday weekend.

Help your kid say no! A drug test on the counter can influence them to make the right decision this weekend. That’s something to be thankful for!

Millions are preparing to travel today. Many millions more are prepping a Thanksgiving feast. Then there’s the countless people gearing up to wait in line over night and cash in on bargain sales Thursday and Friday.

Millions of teens are preparing too.

They’ve been spending days and weeks stocking up on liquor, marijuana, pills, and other illicit drugs for what is now known by some as “Black Wednesday.”

The Wednesday before Thanksgiving is one of the biggest nights for teen drinking and drug use.

It’s a 5 day weekend, or in some cases a mini vacation that lasts 7 days, as some school districts take the entire Thanksgiving week off.

In many states, agencies like the California Highway Patrol will beef up its’ presence on the roads for “maximum enforcement” against drinking and drugged driving.

There are increased sobriety checkpoints, and more officers are on the streets and highways looking for impaired drivers.

Bars will be packed tonight, and many under aged high school and college students will party with alcohol and/or drugs.

Teens who are subject to random drug tests at school know that they can use on a Wednesday night, and will likely test clean come Monday morning at school.

Most have done their research, and have discovered that drugs typically stay in a person’s system for up to 72 hours, when the drug use is highly infrequent.

That means if they parents aren’t testing their child Friday or Saturday, the traces of detectable drugs are long gone by Monday morning.

There are numerous sites where kids ask questions about drug detection. And those are just the kids who either face testing at school, or face testing on occasion by their parents at home.

Parents need to have conversations with their kids, and despite turning in early tonight because of all the food preparations tomorrow, make sure they are awake when their teens return home for the night.

It’s easy to get lost in the myriad of recipes and sales that are the focal point of this weekend, but perhaps parents need to remember what they are most thankful for; family. And some awareness and effort can help ensure that they are again thankful this holiday season in 2013.

His story is very similar to others who have died from drug abuse.

But unlike the others who are buried in cemeteries all over America, Jeff  Thompson is alive to tell his story.

And he wants kids to listen.

Don’t gamble on your teen being the one who survives drug abuse. Take action!

He spoke to the Las Vegas Sun about his ignorance regarding the strength of drugs, the place where drugs eventually took his close drug-using friends, and the best advice he can live from now that he’s sober.

He started using marijuana at 12, evolved to pills at 14, and moved on to heroin by 16.

He told the Sun’s Jackie Valley, “Unfortunately, most of my friends passed away or are in jail,” he said. “There’s not really an in-between.”

Kids that get high should read Jeff Thompson’s story. He said he had no idea how addictive pills were.

And explains, something we’ve illustrated many times, that a balloon of heroin becomes much cheaper than the pills.

Take a quick search online and you will see almost on a daily basis, a story about teens using pills, or parents reaching out after the child has died from pill abuse.

The stories and these victims have numerous things in common.

First and foremost, these are good kids. Many are excellent students. A good portion of them are involved in their community. Some are standout athletes.

They also made one mistake; experimenting with pills.

The first one may have come from a friend, but chances are they came from the family medicine cabinet.

And from where the first one came, the second, third, and fourth pills followed.

Then as those cheap and easy supplies diminish, the kids have to be crafty to find their next high.

Opiates and Benzodiazepines are very addictive. Experimenting with them can lead to addiction very quickly.

Some kids start trying to rummage through their friends’ parents’ medicine cabinets.

Others begin to buy pills.

Kids will go to great lengths to continue the pill use, and if they don’t have a lot of cash, they could resort to trading items they do have for pills.

A kid who has 40-50 xBox games, can easily trade one for a pill, especially if he’s tired of the game, or decides that he needs that pill badly enough.

Kids will also trade electronics, skateboards, shoes, and clothes to stop the interruption in the flow of pills.

Ultimately, most kids cannot keep up. So they turn to heroin.

Long feared as that evil and dangerous drug, the biggest stigma about ever experimenting with heroin was the needle factor.

Most kids do not want to mess around with needles. Most long time adult users don’t even like using the needles.

But at this point, their need for the opiates is a MUST.

Heroin can be taken without a needle. Users can smoke it.

And at $12 a balloon on the street, heroin becomes far more attractive to the addict who has been trying to piecemeal his way to an Oxycontin here or a Percocet there at $25-$40 a pill.

As one law enforcement officer says, a balloon of heroin costs less than the price of the balloon, and for kids who are hooked on opiates, they enjoy it a whole lot more.

The good night kiss test, or the sniff test no longer works when kids come home at curfew.

Unlike smelling for marijuana and alcohol, your nose can’t detect opiates.

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit can.

With treatment trends in mind, the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit can detect a wide variety of pill use.

And for parents who do not know much about home drug tests, the Teensavers kit goes well beyond the science of a positive and negative result.

Cheap or free tests online leave you searching and PAYING for a laboratory to process your positive sample.

One of the most uncomfortable feelings after seeing a preliminary positive result show up on a test you just gave your teen is figuring out what to do next.

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit comes with free lab confirmation — a confidential GC/MS screening of your samples to give you specific scientific confirmation of what is in your loved one’s system.

And to get you through the confusion, fright, and uncertainty Teensavers has a 24/7 hotline for parents to ask questions like

-What’s this pill I found?

-Why is there foil and residue in my child’s jacket?

-What does one line, or a faint line mean on the test, versus two solid lines?

-How can I talk to my teen?

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit also includes a Parental Support Guide, written by America’s Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman.

It offers parents not only an education about drugs, and recognizing the signs, but emotional support on connecting with your teen when it comes to drug conversations.

Our children are precious, and the nose doesn’t always know.

Teensavers not only detects the drug use, but can help deter use.

Set the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit on the counter and it tells your children “we care about your health.”

It empowers them to tell their friends, “I can’t try drugs. My parents test me.”

It helps them fight off that peer pressure.

You can take an interactive tour of the Teensavers website, including a 360 degree tour of the kit and its’ contents by clicking HERE.

We have seven weeks left in the year, and already Will County, Illinois has a new record for heroin or opiate related deaths.

So far in 2012, the county has lost 37 people from heroin.

Last year’s total was 30.

Some parents have been taking the lead in trying to educate parents, but there needs to be more involvement.

DON’T BE CAUGHT OFF GUARD. TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS CAN NOT ONLY DETECT EXPERIMENTATION BEFORE IT BECOMES AN ADDICTION, BUT CAN HELP DETER IT. EMPOWER YOUR TEEN TO SAY “NO I CAN’T TRY THAT. MY PARENTS TEST ME.” CLICK HERE FOR INFORMATION.

Parents need to understand that kids are abusing pills because they are accessible, and they turn to heroin when it is necessary to keep the high.

One of the leading voices is John Roberts, who lost his teenaged son to heroin in 2009.

He has been holding community meetings to educate parents that this is happening to our children at an alarming rate.

Parents in the Will County area, and other communities outside of Chicago need to show support and help spread the message that these drugs are killing our kids.

It’s Friday night.

Teens across America are getting ready for Friday night favorites including, high school football, movies, hanging out at the mall-o-plaza, and trying drugs for the first time.

More than 6,000 kids try drugs for the first time every day.

HAS YOUR TEEN TRIED DRUGS? YOU CAN’T GUESS OR SEE IT WITH YOUR EYES. TEENSAVERS CREATED THE TEST FOR YOUR FAMILY TO DETECT DRUG USE AND DETER TEENS FROM EXPERIMENTING. CLICK HERE TO READ ABOUT THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.

That’s nearly 20,000 new users by the end of the weekend, and that’s not counting alcohol use for the first time by teens and pre-teens.

That also doesn’t even take into consideration the people who try synthetics, because they are not classified as drugs by the FDA. So kids using spice or bath salts tonight are not among the 6,000.

Some kids will experiment with marijuana. It may be the first time they hold a joint in their hands, or put a bong to their lips.

Others think they will experiment safely with “legal medications” while attending a pharming party. That’s where kids bring unidentified pills and throw them in a bowl. Everyone reaches in and takes whatever they get.

Parents need to remember that this first time behaviors are not limited to Friday and Saturday nights.

The average number of kids who try drugs daily is 6,000. In the summer months that number nearly doubles to 11,000.

It’s time we all talk to our kids before they leave the house, and fully understand their plans for the evening. Sleepovers should be double checked.

And when our kids come home at their curfew, we need to engage them to make sure they are coherent and acting normally.

Kids hiding drug use won’t break their curfews because they know they will be questioned more than if they came home on time.

There are countless numbers of teens who come home early on a Friday and Saturday night and tell their parents that they were tired, and wanted to go to bed. Many of them were hiding the fact that they were under the influence.

Our children are precious, and we need to make sure that they stay safe every night of the week.

Don’t lose your teen to drug use.

There are plenty of examples of adolescents talking about  drug use on the internet.

Parents just need to look for it.

Case in point:

This is a question from Yahoo Answers.

Is the person asking this question really 11 years old?

Since it’s anonymous, there’s probably a good chance that this poster is not lying about their age?

But parents we talk with have a hard time considering that their pre-teens could be using at such young ages.

“We see children of all ages using illicit drugs. There’s no magical age number when kids start trying. We see kids starting to use at younger ages, and they are showing a willingness to to expand their drug use from alcohol and marijuana,” says America‘s Parenting Coach Tim Chapman.

Most parents would guess that they wouldn’t have to worry about alcohol and drugs with their kids until those kids are 16 or 17.

But SAMHSA studies show that on average, 6,000 kids try drugs for the first time every day. Some of those are as young as 8-years-old.

Twitter is another popular place where kids speak openly about drugs.

Chapman says parents should monitor their kids’ online activity to see the warning signs. “They put it out there, because they think nobody is paying attention. But you can learn a lot from not only knowing your child’s activities, but their friends’ activity online as well.”

Teensavers home drug test kits are a weapon that parents can use to not only detect adolescent drug use, but deter it.

Chapman says most parents aren’t even aware that lab accurate home drug testing exists.

“Parents will ask me, “should I test my teen?” and I tell them absolutely”

For information on Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits, click HERE.