Tag Archive: oklahoma


The Box family today released a statement regarding the Oklahoma Sooner’s overdose and accidental death.

There is no greater pain than the loss of a child. The pain is intensified by knowing that the death of your child could have been prevented. Austin was a young man who carried the weight of the world on his shoulders. He was grateful for his many talents, and felt he must always live up to his gifts. Two words he spoke often say so much, “Of course”. It did not matter who was asking, whether it be a fan asking for an autograph, or simply a stranger wanting to talk–the response was a smile and “Of course”. His greatest fear was letting down other people whether it was his teammates, coaches, friends, or family. In his twenty-two years of life, he never thought to complain because he felt he had been given so much.

Our son endured many injuries during the last seven years of his life, most of them required surgery. The last was the most frightening for him. In August of the 2010 season, he had a disc rupture in his back, and he lost the feeling in his left foot. We were certain his career was over. As always though, he battled back when he saw the team needed him. Willing his battered body back to the field where only the most elite do battle. It is with much sadness; we look back and see that recently Austin had turned to other methods of managing his pain. Methods that we hope if others are employing, they will see this tragic accident as a message and think about the consequences. Our greatest regret is that Austin did not feel he could share his pain with those who loved him, and those he touched. He chose to suffer in silence rather than to feel he let someone down, or hurt his family.

We will forever love, honor, and cherish his memory. Thank you to all of those who have shared stories about how Austin touched your lives in a positive way. We are comforted by the knowledge that God knows what is in a man’s heart. Anyone that knew Austin would give testament to his pure heart. The love and pride we feel for our son cannot be diminished by the cause of his death. He gave us so much joy and so many wonderful memories. He will forever be “Mommy’s baby” and “Daddy’s little boy”.

With much grief and sadness,

Craig and Gail Box

 

Our hearts go out to the Box family.   Hopefully this serves as a reminder to all parents to closely monitor their loved ones.   Perhaps we can prevent tragedies, like this one, from happening again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In the wake of the Austin Box death, Myteensavers is being asked what is Oxycontin?

For more information click HERE:

OxyContin

Generic Name: oxycodone (ox i KOE done)
Brand Names: ETH-Oxydose, OxyContin, Oxyfast, OxyIR, Percolone, Roxicodone, Roxicodone Intensol

What is OxyContin?

OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine.

OxyContin tablets are used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Oxycodone is not for treating pain just after a surgery unless you were already taking oxycodone before the surgery.

OxyContin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about OxyContin

OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. OxyContin should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Do not drink alcohol while you are taking OxyContin. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with a narcotic pain medicine. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol.

Never take more than your prescribed dose of OxyContin. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain. OxyContin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Do not stop using OxyContin suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using OxyContin?

Do not use OxyContin if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others), or to a narcotic cough medicine that contains codeine, hydrocodone, or dihydrocodeine.

You should also not take OxyContin if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.

OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. This medicine should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Before using OxyContin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • underactive thyroid;
  • curvature of the spine;
  • a history of head injury or brain tumor;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • low blood pressure;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • Addison’s disease or other adrenal gland disorders;
  • enlarged prostate, urination problems;
  • mental illness; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. OxyContin may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. OxyContin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

Source: Drugs.com

Myteensavers feels for the familyof Oklahoma Sooner LB Austin Box.   Reports today have surfaced that Box was found dead, and it was reported that Box may have died snorting Oxycontin.

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Oxycontin is a serious drug, and even the fittest and toughest people can succumb to it.   If this report is true, maybe we need to take a closer look at stronger drug testing.   It starts with the pros, then through the NCAA schools, and perhaps high schools.   The NFL has testing.   Is it strict enough?

Myteensavers advocates home drug testing to keep kids in line.   It’s tragic to see young and talented people lose their lives to drugs.   2500 children start using for the first time every day.   Let’s keep our athletes and our children safe and drug free.

Oxycontin is just one of the 12 substances tested in the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.