Tag Archive: New Mexico


Drug dealers will do anything to manipulate your teen.

Teensavers was alerted to helpful hints from the United Prevention people, and their message conveys from DEA information about drug paraphernalia.

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Their alert said:

According to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), drug paraphernalia are often marketed specifically to youth with colorful logos, celebrity pictures and fun designs. The items are meant to look harmless and disguise the dangers of taking controlled substances, and some items can even be found at the mall. Being aware of trendy drug items is the first step when staying involved as a parent.

Parents often have an idea if their child is using drugs based on physical and emotional signs (visit http://www.theantidrug.com for more information on what to look for), but learning what paraphernalia are used to engage in drug-related activities and how to identify these items can help parents understand even more. “Drug paraphernalia is any legitimate equipment, product or material that is modified for making, using or concealing illegal drugs such as cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine,” stated the DEA.

Drug paraphernalia generally falls into two categories. User-specific products include certain pipes, smoking masks, bongs, cocaine freebase kits, marijuana grow kits, roach clips and items such as hollowed out soda cans or fake pagers used to conceal illegal drugs. Dealer-specific products are used by drug traffickers for preparing illegal drugs for distribution at the street level including scales, vials and baggies.

Under the Federal Drug Paraphernalia Statute, which is part of the Controlled Substances Act, it is illegal to possess, sell, transport, import or

export drug paraphernalia, but with the popularity and ease of use of the Internet, law enforcement face another challenge. Drug paraphernalia pushers have become businessmen and women on the Internet, selling their items worldwide. To cut down on the availability online, in 2003 the government initiated Operation Pipedreams, a national sweep that shut down some Internet sites selling drug paraphernalia. Eighteen Internet companies targeted accounted for more than a quarter of a billion dollars in retail drug paraphernalia sales annually. While the sweep worked, over the years sites have continued to pop up, making it convenient for teens to skirt around parents to make their purchases.

Because drug paraphernalia is often marketed specifically to youth with colorful logos, celebrity pictures and designs, it is important for parents to know what to look for. The items are meant to look harmless and give the impression that the dangers of taking controlled substances are not only OK, but fun. As a new trend, younger teens might be tempted to purchases the items to appear cool.

The Unified Prevention! (UP!) Coalition for a Drug-Free Doña Ana County, an initiative of the Community Foundation of Southern New Mexico, is dedicated to ending the cycle of drug abuse in southern New Mexico. For more information on teens and drug use, or to get involved in the collation, call (575) 521-4794. A Community that’s Aware is a Community that Cares is submitted by Charlotte Tallman, media campaign coordinator for the Unified Prevention! (UP!) Coalition for a Drug-Free Doña Ana County, an initiative of the Community Foundation of Southern New Mexico.

Kids have access to drugs.

Sometimes they go seeking them. Sometimes they accidentally find them. Sometimes they become drug users just by being in the room.

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In Connecticut, a kindergarten student had a most unique set of items for show and tell when he came to school on Monday; heroin.

The boy wore his step-father’s jacket to school, and unknowingly was transporting 50 bags of heroin.

When he brought them out for show and tell, the teacher phoned the principal, who then phoned authorities.

When the 35-year-old Santos Roman showed up to retrieve the jacket and the heroin inside, police were waiting for him.

State services are caring for the boy until other relatives are located.

These sorts of stories are not rare. They happen more than people thing. Kids find substances and bring them to school. We’ve seen marijuana, cocaine, pills, and heroin brought to school by an innocent child.

These parents are surely setting bad examples for their kids.

There is no word on whether or not the kid had any drugs in his system. That certainly was not reporter by local media outlets in Bridgeport.

This story comes on the heels of a Las Cruces, New Mexico couple arrested after their children tested positive for cocaine.

Eric Lee Estrada, 30, and Stacey Carreras, 26, face four countes of negligent child abuse.

Apparently the couple was smoking cocaine and possibly doing so in the presence of their children.

West Virginia has a serious problem.   A DUI problem.   But it’s not what you think.   A Lieutenant in Charleston says that 70% of the DUIs in his city are something other than alcohol.    That’s 700 DUI arrests.

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If you didn’t know, there’s a prescription abuse problem in West Virginia.     Like New Mexico, the most popular pill is Oxycontin.

“Prescription drugs are becoming an epidemic across West Virginia, and we are seeing more and more drivers under the influence of pills,” the Lieutenant told Charleston’s Daily Mail.  “There are a lot of officers across the state who are intimidated because they don’t know the process, because it’s been driven home in their training that you need that BAC (blood alcohol content) to make the arrest.

“It boils down to this: A person impaired by a pill or alcohol is impaired just the same,” he said.

Williams is also the regional coordinator for the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety.

Teensavers reminds parents that just because they can’t smell alcohol on the breath of their teen driver, it does not mean that their teen is sober.   Impairment can happen in just minutes the way teens abuse pills.   When pills are smashed, the coating that enables the time-release is diminished.   The active ingredients in the pills get into the bloodstreams of teens rapidly.