Tag Archive: National Institute on Drug Abuse


The National Institute on Drug Abuse has created a graphic to show the national levels of drug use. The people at Teensavers thought it would be good to show parents who don’t regularly visit the NIDA site.

Remember, you can’t trust your eyes and nose to see if your teen is on drugs. By the time you can recognize the physical signs, addiction may already be in place.

TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT DETECTS EARLY DRUG USE AND HELPS PARENTS IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM AND STARTS THEM TOWARDS A SOLUTION. CLICK HERE TO GET AN IN DEPTH LOOK AT THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.

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If you are a parent of pre-teen or teen and you haven’t heard of spice, bath salts, ivory wave, or K2, you better start doing your homework. Here’s a quick cliff’s notes version of what they are, and why they are still here.

NEED QUICK AND EASY DRUG EDUCATION? VISIT MYTEENSAVERS.COM BY CLICKING HERE.

Those products go by many names, but they all have one thing in common; they are synthetic marijuana.

Synthetic marijuana is designed to be a substitute for the real thing, but carry the same psychoaltering effects. The real problem is that they are far more dangerous than the real thing, and some kids have no fear using the products.

These synthetic cannabanoids are sold as incense, potpourri, or bath salts. They are clearly marked, “not for human consumption.” But don’t be fooled. That warning is really an advertisement for teens. The message really states, “if you smoke this, you’re going to get really high.”

Despite numerous attempts to criminalize and ban the products, the creators have been very, well, creative in getting around those bans. State and federal lawmakers have tried banning the chemical combinations, but the manufacturers continue to tweak the formula to escape the ban.

The mind-altering effects come from the chemical compound, which is sprayed onto the products. Essentially it doesn’t matter what the originating product is, once it is coated in the chemical solution, it acts as a powerful drugs. You could go pull some dandelions from your backyard, and if they are dipped in the right solution, smoking them would mimic the effects of pot.

So why are these products to dangerous? Well they are a toxic mixture of chemicals, and they can create numerous symptoms in teens. They can be hard to diagnose. One of the leading theories, though never fully confirmed, was that Demi Moore was smoking this type of product when she had her 9-1-1 episode.

Convulsions, sweating, and hallucinations are just some of the side-effects. A recent story in the USA Today quoted Joanna Cohen, an emergency medicine physician at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington. DC. It cited her writings in Pediatrics, that ER doctors have been having a very hard time detecting the use in kids.

Where there is concern is that parents are the first to argue that they could “tell if THEIR child is on drugs.” This is a fallacy that too many parents believe. They often do not notice any kind of drug use until the user is addicted.

But parents can educate themselves about the warning signs. They can also visit their pediatrician and discuss the possibility that their teen has been using these synthetics. As Cohen reminds in the USA Today article, the long term effects include memory loss and psychosis.

Unclear on which treatment is right for a loved one? Your answer may be found in the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

TOO EARLY FOR TREATMENT BECAUSE YOU AREN’T SURE THERE IS A PROBLEM? CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT.

Their latest brochure with information can be found by clicking this link: http://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/treatmentbrochure_web.pdf

Drug addiction should be taken seriously and all types of drug use should be treated.

The Government is providing a new tool for parents to learn about synthetic drugs.

CONCERNED YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE USED OTHER DRUGS LIKE MARIJUANA, COCAINE, ECSTASY, OR POPULAR PAIN RELIEVERS LIKE XANAX, PERCOCET, AND OXYCONTIN? CLICK HERE FOR THE SIMPLE AND PRIVATE FIVE TEST THAT GIVES YOU ANSWERS IN JUST MINUTES.

The new information is the result of several conferences with White House Drug Policy Director Kerlikowske and public health and safety officials.

The information kit includes a slidecast about synthetic drugs, a corresponding podcast and video and a printable guide “so parents can present details on what to look for, what the street names are and what the effects of these substances are to others in their community,” officials said in a release.

The kit is available at The Partnership at Drugfree.org.

“Synthetic drugs like Spice, K2, and ‘bath salts’ are a serious threat to the health and safety of young people throughout America,” Kerlikowske said in the statement.

The statement said synthetic drugs are often marketed as legal, and are sometimes labeled “herbal incense” or “bath salts” and sold in small pouches or packets over the Internet, in tobacco and smoke shops, drug paraphernalia shops, gas stations and convenience stores.

In December, the National Institute on Drug Abuse said one in nine high school seniors had used “Spice” or “K2” over the past year. That made synthetic marijuana the second most frequently used illicit drug, after marijuana, among high school seniors.

Researchers from The University of Washington and Virginia Tech released this wonderful study.

Their findings: 2 simple talks with your teens each year, can help make a huge impact on your teen when it comes to smoking pot.

Here is their press release:

CLICK HERE if you suspect your teen may be using drugs, or you need help with a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

BLACKSBURG, Va., June 29, 2011 –
Nearly a third of high school students in the United States report
smoking marijuana. Despite the mixed messages about the safety of
marijuana, it is risky behavior for teens, who are, after all, still
developing.

Researchers from Virginia Tech and the University of
Washington have demonstrated that a brief, voluntary conversation with
an adult led to up to a 20 percent decrease in marijuana use for
teenagers who frequently used the drug. The research was published
online June 20 in the journal Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,
in the article, “Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational
Enhancement Therapy with Nontreatment-Seeking Adolescent Cannabis Users:
A Further Test of the Teen Marijuana Check-Up,” by Denise D. Walker, Robert S. Stephens, Roger Roffman, Josephine DeMarce, Brian Lozano, Sheri Towe, and Belinda Berg

Walker, research assistant professor of social work and co-director of the University of Washington’s Innovative Programs Research Group,
said, “Adolescence is a big developmental period for learning adult
roles. Smoking marijuana regularly can impede development and school
performance, and it sets kids up for other risky behaviors.”

But a “non-finger wagging” approach called Teen Marijuana Check-Up could encourage teens to reduce their marijuana use.

“Teen
marijuana users have few options for sorting out the disparate
information on the risks of smoking marijuana. The programs we are
developing and testing will hopefully help fill the gap,” said Stephens,
chair of psychology at Virginia Tech and director of the addictions
lab.

Many teens have concerns about their use of marijuana, “even
if they’re not sharing them with family or friends,” Walker said. If a
convenient and easy opportunity to weigh the pros and cons of their drug
use is offered that isn’t “shaming or blaming,” kids will participate
in it voluntarily, she said.

The researchers went to high school
classrooms and gave short presentations describing myths and facts about
marijuana, common reasons why teens smoke it, and its health, and
behavior consequences.

The researchers told the students about the
study, saying it was intended to give feedback on – not treat – each
student’s marijuana use. Students could volunteer privately. Of about
7,100 students who heard about the study, 619 volunteered, and 310 met
its criterion of smoking marijuana regularly.

The participants,
ninth through 12th graders attending Seattle public schools, had two
one-on-one meetings with health educators. During the meetings, which
lasted 30-60 minutes each over two weeks, the health educators used one
of two approaches:

  • Motivational interviewing, in which the
    health educator and student discussed the student’s marijuana use and
    how it might be interfering with the student’s life, goals, and personal
    values, and the health educator told the student about social norms of
    how much others use the drug.
  • An educational approach in which a
    PowerPoint presentation described current marijuana research and health
    and psychological effects of marijuana use.

Participants in
the motivational interviewing group started the study using marijuana
40 out of the previous 60 days. Three months after counseling they had
decreased their use 20 percent, to 32 out of 60 days. After a year they
still showed a 15 percent decrease, 34 days out of 60.

Participants
in the educational treatment group had slower results, reporting an 8
percent decrease from 38 to 35 days out of 60 days three months after
the treatment ended. A year later, they reported using marijuana 34 of
60 days, an 11 percent overall drop.

The researchers called the
findings “encouraging in that apparently meaningful reductions in
cannabis use resulting from the brief meetings were sustained over a
relatively lengthy period of time.”

Stephens said, “A unique
aspect of this research has been our ability to get teens to voluntarily
sign up for the programs. Previous research has focused mainly on teens
who are coerced into treatment programs by schools, parents, or the
legal system, but there are many more users who may profit from talking
to someone about their use if we can give them options that are
appealing.”

Walker said that the low-burden, low-cost program
could be disseminated to drug and alcohol counselors in schools. The
program “is supposed to attract people who aren’t ready for a full
treatment, but are interested in having a conversation with a
professional trained to discuss concerns with substance use,” she said.

The study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Of the co-authors, Josephine DeMarce of Salem, Va., is a 2006 Ph.D. graduate in psychology from Virginia Tech; Brian Lozano of Charleston, S.C., is a 2008 Ph.D. graduate of psychology from Virginia Tech; Sheri Towe of Martinez, Ga., is a Ph.D. student at Virginia Tech; Roger Roffman
is professor of sociology and director of the Innovative Programs
Research Group at the University of Washington; and Belinda Berg is a
health educator with the School of Social Work at the University of
Washington.

Founded in 1872, Virginia Tech
attracts students from all 50 states and more than 100 countries. The
university’s eight colleges achieve quality, innovation, and results
through teaching, research, and outreach in Blacksburg and at other
campus centers in Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia, Richmond,
Southern Virginia, Hampton Roads, and Roanoke.