Tag Archive: intervention


If you didn’t catch last night’s Intervention, it was about a mother who had a severe meth and Oxycontin habit.

Detect Oxycontin use in a 3-minute affordable, reliable, and private Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

And the person she got her drugs from was typically her brother.

While many users may experiment with drugs for the first time with a sibling or loved one, most typically do not continue buying from their siblings.

This is important for parents to look for and recognize especially when they discover that an eldest child of theirs has experimented with drugs.

Sometimes it will completely turn the younger siblings away, and sometimes it may make drug use more attractive or less dangerous to those kids.

If they see that brother or sister is using, and they are carrying on a seemingly normal and functioning life, they may perceive reduced risks with using drugs.

Oftentimes even while using together, sibling will hide their actual drug use, and only admit to a lesser usage.

If you haven’t watched A&E’s Intervention, it’s a powerful show.   It’s worth hiting the DVR record button.

There are a lot of patients with severe alcohol problems. Parents can learn from the interventionist just how significant of a role they play in enabling a young drinker or drug abuser.

You can see the Huffington Post’s recap on Intervention, including a video clip, by clicking HERE.

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Oxycontin is powerful.   It’s a very strong narcotic when used legitimately and it is very glamorous to substance abusers.

RELIABLE, AFFORDABLE, PRIVATE HOME DRUG TESTS AVAILABLE HERE:

Fox News recently ran a story on the celebrity obsession with Oxycontin.   You can read about it by clicking HERE.

And  while many would think that this is obsession is just a popular crazy
for Hollywood’s rich and famous, it is not.    Teens are using and
becoming hooked on Oxycontin and other opiates at alarming rates.   They
scrape together money to buy these pills.   They might also borrow, and
ultimately steal their way to another Oxy.   And when they can’t afford
to pay the $25-$40 price per pill, they turn to heroin.

Heroin is
also a strong substance, but is much cheaper than Oxy and more readily
available.    Soon, those kids who were hooked on Oxycontin, are now
hooked on heroin.

It doesn’t take much for a teen to get
hooked on these medications.  They are not scared to try these pills.
And once they like this high, they come back for more.

Home
drug testing is a good way to keep your teen away from drugs.   Just
having a Teensavers home drug test around the house can help influence
your teen to say, “No. I can’t try that.  My parents drug test me.”
And using home drug tests can help ensure that they aren’t sneaking
medications into their system.    It is often difficult to detect when a
teen is using a pill.   Unlike marijuana or alcohol, there is no
smell.

Hollywood’s obsession with fashion certainly transcends
to the public.   They want to wear what Jennifer Aniston, Kim
Kardashian, or Justin Bieber are wearing.    Likewise, the public might
want to experience what Courtney Love, Heath Ledger, or Michael Jackson
once used.

Make sure your loved ones are drug free.   Consider using Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits.

 

 

 

If you know someone who needs help with an addiction, the Teensavers team can help.  CLICK HERE.

 

WASHINGTON
(AP) — Addiction isn’t just about willpower. It’s a chronic brain
disease, says a new definition aimed at helping families and their
doctors better understand the challenges of treating it.

“Addiction
is about a lot more than people behaving badly,” says Dr. Michael M.
Miller of the American Society for Addiction Medicine.

That’s true
whether it involves drugs and alcohol or gambling and compulsive
eating, the doctors group said Monday. And like other chronic conditions
such as heart disease or diabetes, treating addiction and preventing
relapse is a long-term endeavor, the specialists concluded.

Addiction
generally is described by its behavioral symptoms — the highs, the
cravings, and the things people will do to achieve one and avoid the
other. The new definition doesn’t disagree with the standard guide for
diagnosis based on those symptoms.

But two decades of neuroscience
have uncovered how addiction hijacks different parts of the brain, to
explain what prompts those behaviors and why they can be so hard to
overcome. The society’s policy statement, published on its Web site,
isn’t a new direction as much as part of an effort to translate those
findings to primary care doctors and the general public.

“The
behavioral problem is a result of brain dysfunction,” agrees Dr. Nora
Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

She
welcomed the statement as a way to help her own agency’s work to spur
more primary care physicians to screen their patients for signs of
addiction. NIDA estimates that 23 million Americans need treatment for
substance abuse but only about 2 million get that help. Trying to add
compassion to the brain findings, NIDA even has made readings from
Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey into Night” a part of meetings
where primary care doctors learn about addiction.

Then there’s the
frustration of relapses, which doctors and families alike need to know
are common for a chronic disease, Volkow says.

“You have family
members that say, ‘OK, you’ve been to a detox program, how come you’re
taking drugs?'” she says. “The pathology in the brain persists for years
after you’ve stopped taking the drug.”

Just what does happen in the brain? It’s a complex interplay of emotional, cognitive and behavioral networks.

Genetics
plays a role, meaning some people are more vulnerable to an addiction
if they, say, experiment with drugs as a teenager or wind up on potent
prescription painkillers after an injury.

Age does, too. The
frontal cortex helps put the brakes on unhealthy behaviors, Volkow
explains. It’s where the brain’s reasoning side connects to
emotion-related areas. It’s among the last neural regions to mature, one
reason that it’s harder for a teenager to withstand peer pressure to
experiment with drugs.

Even if you’re not biologically vulnerable
to begin with, perhaps you try alcohol or drugs to cope with a stressful
or painful environment, Volkow says. Whatever the reason, the brain’s
reward system can change as a chemical named dopamine conditions it to
rituals and routines that are linked to getting something you’ve found
pleasurable, whether it’s a pack of cigarettes or a few drinks or even
overeating. When someone’s truly addicted, that warped system keeps them
going back even after the brain gets so used to the high that it’s no
longer pleasurable.

Make no mistake: Patients still must choose to
fight back and treat an addiction, stresses Miller, medical director of
the Herrington Recovery Center at Rogers Memorial Hospital in
Oconomowoc, Wis.

But understanding some of the brain reactions at
the root of the problem will “hopefully reduce some of the shame about
some of these issues, hopefully reduce stigma,” he says.

And while
most of the neuroscience centers on drug and alcohol addiction, the
society notes that it’s possible to become addicted to gambling, sex or
food although there’s no good data on how often that happens. It’s time
for better study to find out, Miller says.

Meanwhile, Volkow says
intriguing research is under way to use those brain findings to develop
better treatments — not just to temporarily block an addict’s high but
to strengthen the underlying brain circuitry to fend off relapse.

Topping
Miller’s wish list: Learning why some people find recovery easier and
faster than others, and “what does brain healing look like.”

EDITOR’S NOTE — Lauran Neergaard covers health and medical issues for The Associated Press.

People ask, who reliable is the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit?   It is laboratory accurate, which means you can rely on the product.   It is also easy to use.   We know that parents do not want to put on rubber gloves and mess around with urine.   That’s why our test is unlike those other dip strips and shake and activate cups.

America’s Parenting Coach show us how easy it is to use a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit in this video.     And if you need one of these tests for your family, you can buy them at Amazon.com by clicking HERE.

 

The creators of the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit take great pride in being a Parent Tested, Parent Approved winner.   We also interact with parents every day who support us.   We appreciate The Steady Hand mom’s blog.    It is great to know that parents hold us in regard as a necessity between posts about coupons, and other valuable products and services.   Whether or not you agree with home drug testing, having the conversation the drug talk with your kids is a great start.   Here is the link to the steady hand blog.

http://thesteadyhandblog.com/myteensavers-com/

It would surprise most people.   But pr0-active and caring parents are making great strides in protecting their children.    They are out buying home drug tests for their teens.  We all know Google.  Well, Google ranks all things Google.    That includes searches.   A common search phrase found is quite simply: Where can I get a home drug test kit.

The answer is also simple: Click RIGHT HERE!!!

Yes, you can get them cheaper.   But before you buy, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is it accurate?   The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit is 99.9% accurate
  • Is it FDA approved?   Absolutely.  The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit is FDA cleared for sale.
  • Where is it made?    The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit is made in the USA.    Most of those cheaper tests are foreign made.   That means you cannot count on their levels to be right for your family!
  • Is it messy?    The Teensavers Home Drug Test kit is designed to make it easy to use without a concern of making a mess.   No parent wants to play lab technician and handle urine or dip a test strip into an open cup of urine.   The Teensavers cup is made to lock and give you results without dipping, shaking, or flipping over your cup.
  • Will this test provide me with more than answers?   The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit goes beyond results, providing you with a toll-free hotline for you to get your questions answered.    Our trained counselors can provide you with test intructions, answer your questions about a certain drug, or help find you the best treatment for your family.

The answer is right here:

The choice shouldn’t be difficult.   We all want to see our children grow up into adulthood and perhaps have children of their own.   Each year, we lose thousands of teens to drug use.   Isn’t it time to stop the pattern?   Most parent have no problem saying, “it’s not my kid.”    But sadly, it is someone else’s kid.    They too may have been saying “not my kid,” before their heartbreaking discovery.

Consider the benefits of the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.  A 12-panel test screens for:

Marijuana

Opiates

PCP

Cocaine

Methamphetamines

Amphetamines

Methodone

Oxycodone

Baribiturates

Benzodiazapines

Ecstasy MDMA

Tricyclic Anti-Depressants

This press release from UNC shows the severity of prescription drug abuse.    If you know someone that needs help, or you need a Teensavers home drug test kit CLICK HERE.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Unintentional overdose deaths in teens and adults have reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. In some 20 states in 2007 the number of unintentional drug poisoning deaths exceeded either motor vehicle crashes or suicides, two of the leading causes of injury death. Prescription opioid pain medications are driving this overdose epidemic. Opioid pain medications were also involved in about 36 percent of all poisoning suicides in the U.S. in 2007.

In a commentary article released ahead of the print version in the April 19, 2011 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, physicians affiliated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center cite data noting that in 2007 unintentional deaths due to prescription opioid pain killers were involved in more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

The new report was co-authored by CDC medical epidemiologist Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH; Richard H. Weisler, MD, adjunct professor of psychiatry at UNC and adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center; and Ashwin A. Patkar, MD, associate professor in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences department at Duke University. More than describing the scope of unintentional prescription opioid overdose deaths, their report is aimed at helping doctors control the problem.

Approximately 27,500 people died from unintentional drug overdoses in 2007, driven to a large extent by prescription opioid overdoses. Dr. Weisler says that to put this in perspective, the number of 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths alone represents tragically about 4.6 times as many deaths as all U.S. fatalities in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from the beginning of both wars through Feb 20, 2011.

Alternatively, the 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths would be equivalent to losing an airplane carrying 150 passengers and crew every day for six months, which clearly would be totally unacceptable from a public health perspective.

The CDC sounded alarms regarding the issue in several reports last year. In June 2010, for example, the agency announced that the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found that 1 in 5 high school students in the United States have abused prescription drugs, including the opioid painkillers OxyContin, Percocet, and Vicodin. Opioids are synthetic versions of opium that are used to treat moderate and severe pain.

And in June last year the CDC reported that visits to hospital emergency departments involving nonmedical use of prescription narcotic pain relievers has more than doubled, rising 111 percent, between 2004 and 2008.

The authors note various reports citing some key factors linked to the problem: increased nonmedical use of opioids without a prescription “… solely for the feeling it causes” and that medical providers, psychiatrists and primary care physicians included, may fail to anticipate among their patients the extent of overlap between chronic pain, mental illness and substance abuse.

For example, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with unipolar, bipolar, anxiety, psychotic, non-psychotic, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders will also have substance abuse problems. Dr. Patkar said, “Similarly, people with substance abuse are more likely to have another mental illness and a significant number of patients with chronic pain will have mental illness or substance abuse problems.”

Moreover, opioids, benzodiazepines, anti-depressants, and sleep aids “are frequently prescribed in combination despite their potentially harmful additive effects,” the authors point out. And it’s the combinations of these drugs that are frequently found in the toxicology reports of people dying of overdoses.

In their recommendations to physicians, the authors suggest that before prescribing opioids, doctors should try non-narcotic medications as well as, when possible, physical therapy, psychotherapy, exercise, and other non-medicinal methods. And that these methods are given “an adequate trial” before moving to opioids.

“It is very important to screen patients with chronic pain who may require opioid therapy for substance abuse and mental health problems, especially depression and other mood and anxiety disorders and address these problems adequately,” they state.

Americans are rejoicing the elimination of the world’s number one terrorist.    Osama Bin Laden and his forces terrorized the world.  The most devastating day, of course, was September 11th.

The move to eradicate Bin Laden was a move to protect our future.      unfortunately, many Americans take their future for granted.   Most people (including a big percentage of those celebrants in Times Square and outside the White House) hadn’t thought about Osama Bin Laden in a very long time.      There was a general complacency in society.   Today people are cheering, but some time in the next week or so terrorism will fall into the back of their minds.

Drug use is like terrorism.   It is around constantly, it is deadly, and it can strike at any time.     Many parents may briefly ponder teen alcohol and drug use, but they don’t take it seriously.    They need to send a message.     Parents need to be pro-active.  They need family intelligence.   Parents first should be vigilant by asking questions.   Communication is key.

But there’s a weapon they should also use.   A home drug test is like the parents’ version of Navy Seals.     It protects the future of your teen.    If there is an issue, you detect it and eliminate it as soon as possible.

The correlation may be silly, but the issues are not.  Drug addiction is a serious problem.   Days before authorizing the attack on Bin Laden, the President’s office released a write-up on the epidemic of teen prescription abuse.     2500 kids try drugs for the first time every day.      The statistics are real.   The threat is real.

Click here for the answer to protecting your family.

Myteensavers.com has been communicating with parents, telling them that pills are a problem.    Unfortunately America is in a stir over President Obama’s birth certificate.  But more importantly, the White House is sending out its own message about the devastation of opiates.

Here is the government press release!

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION RELEASES ACTION PLAN TO ADDRESS NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE EPIDEMIC;
ANNOUNCES FDA ACTION REQUIRING DRUG MAKERS TO DEVELOP EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR PRESCRIBERS ABOUT SAFE USE OF OPIOIDS

New Strategy Strikes Balance between Cracking down on Drug Diversion and Protecting Delivery of Effective Pain Management

Washington, D.C.—Today, Gil Kerlikowske, White House Director of National Drug Control Policy; Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Services, Howard Koh, M.D.; Food and Drug Administration Commissioner, Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.; and DEA Administrator, Michele M. Leonhart released the Obama Administration’s comprehensive action plan to address the national prescription drug abuse epidemic and announced new Federal requirements aimed at educating the medical community about proper prescribing practices.

The Administration’s Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis provides a national framework for reducing prescription drug diversion and abuse by supporting the expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs, recommending more convenient and environmentally responsible disposal methods to remove unused medications from the home, supporting education for patients and healthcare providers, and reducing the prevalence of pill mills and doctor shopping through enforcement efforts. The plan is the culmination of six months of collaboration across the Federal government, with agencies including the Departments of Justice, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and others.

In support of the action plan, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced that it is requiring an Opioids Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). The new program will require manufacturers of long-acting and extended-release opioids to provide educational programs to prescribers of these medications, as well as materials prescribers can use when counseling patients about the risks and benefits of opioid use. The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 gave FDA the authority to require manufacturers to develop and implement a REMS to ensure the benefits of a drug or biological product outweigh its risks.

“Today we are making an unprecedented commitment to combat the growing problem of prescription drug abuse,” said Vice President Biden. “The Government, as well as parents, patients, health care providers, and manufacturers all play a role in preventing abuse. This plan will save lives, and it will substantially lessen the burden this epidemic takes on our families, communities, and workforce.”

“The toll our Nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic has taken in communities nationwide is devastating ,” said Director Kerlikowske. “We share a responsibility to protect our communities from the damage done by prescription drug abuse. This plan will build upon our already unprecedented efforts to coordinate a national response to this public health crisis by addressing the threat at the Federal, state, and local level.”

“Abuse of prescription drugs, especially opioids, represents an alarming public health crisis.” said Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H. Assistant Secretary for Health. “This Plan, which coordinates a public health approach with a public safety approach, offers hope and health to our Nation.”

“Unintentional drug overdose is a growing epidemic in the US and is now the leading cause of injury death in 17 states,” CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said. “There are effective and emerging strategies out there to address this problem. Support for this action plan will help us implement those strategies which will go a long way to save lives and reduce the tremendous burden this problem has on our healthcare system and our society.”

“Long-acting and extended-release opioid drugs have benefit when used properly and are a necessary component of pain management for certain patients, but we know that they pose serious risks when used improperly, with serious negative consequences for individuals, families, and communities,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “The prescriber education component of this Opioid REMS balances the need for continued access to these medications with stronger measures to reduce their risks.”

“DEA is committed to implementing this important and much needed action plan to reduce the demand for prescription drugs, enforce our nation’s drug laws, and take back unneeded prescription drugs,” said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. “When abused, prescription drugs are just as dangerous and just as addictive as drugs like methamphetamine or heroin. The more we can do to stop the abuse of prescription drugs, the more effective we will be in reducing the death, destruction and despair that accompanies all drug abuse.”

Prescription drug abuse is our Nation’s fastest-growing drug problem. The number of people who have unintentionally overdosed on prescription drugs now exceeds the number who overdosed during the crack cocaine epidemic of the 1980’s and the black tar heroin epidemic of the 1970’s combined. In 2007, approximately 27,000 people died from unintentional drug overdoses, driven mostly by prescription drugs. Additionally, a ccording to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the number of Americans in 2009 aged 12 and older currently abusing pain relievers has increased by 20 percent since 2002. Further, visits by individuals to hospital emergency rooms involving the misuse or abuse of pharmaceutical drugs have doubled over the past five years.

ONDCP is coordinating an unprecedented government-wide public health approach to reduce drug use and its consequences in the United States . This effort includes requesting an increase in funding for drug prevention by $123 million and treatment programs by $99 million dollars for Fiscal Year 2012, to train and engage primary health care to intervene in emerging cases of drug abuse, expand and improve specialty care for addiction—including care for families and veterans, and to better manage drug-related offenders in community corrections.

To read the full Action Plan, click here.

To read the FDA’s Opioids Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS), click here.

To get involved in DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Initiative, click here.