Tag Archive: Houston


What started out as a night of drug fun with friends, ended with an 18-year-old’s death.

Now one of the friends who secured the drugs for the kids to experiment will spend the next 12 1/2 years in prison.

A federal judge sentenced Wesley Sweeney for providing a synthetic compound that resulted in death of one buddy and the hospitalization of another in Grand Forks.

We first told you about this story back in June.

Prosecutors charged 11 people in the wake of the Grand Forks synthetic drug conspiracy, Sweeney is the first to be sentenced for causing death and bodily injury.

Sweeney admitted buying two hallucinogens on June 10 from Adam Budge, and then providing the drugs to Bjerk and the 15-year-old. The friends pooled their money together to use drugs, and Sweeney was the one who purchased them.

About 5:45 a.m., June 11, Bjerk was found dead on a nearby lawn. C.J. and Sweeney, who also took the drugs, were found nearby, disoriented and incoherent, and were hospitalized.

A plea deal spared Sweeney from the 20-year mandatory minimum sentence.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Myers has identified Andrew Spofford, 22, as the “hobby chemist,” who bought chemicals from Europe, Asia and Houston to make the hallucinogens.

In less than a week, the drugs killed two and led to serious health issues for a handful of others, including juveniles.

Elijah Stai was the other person who died. He was 17-years-old.

The courtroom was emotional, as families of Sweeney and Bjerk, once close friends, were now were torn apart by the tragedy.

Keith and Debbie Bjerk said they warned their son to stay away from Sweeney last spring because they saw him as a bad influence with a criminal record. But their warning wasn’t enough.

Christian questioned why he had to stay away from Sweeney. Bjerk said during his statement. “I think we all know why now.”

But this was a night out of drug fun for all involved. Sweeney’s family maintains that their son was not a criminal but a drug addict, and he was merely the guy who was able to get his hands on the drugs.

They also maintained that their son was lied to, regarding the exact substance.

Sweeney’s attorney, David Dusek, told Erickson that Sweeney did not sell any drugs to Bjerk or C.J., but took the drugs himself, too, in a tragic “nightmare,” that started with three friends partying.

Sweeney put the powdered hallucinogen in “lines” on a table and offered it to anyone, ingesting some himself. “He didn’t encourage anyone else to take it,” Dusek said.

This is a reminder to parents and kids the nature of the responsibility regarding obtaining drugs and alcohol.

The kid who merely makes the run, could be the kid that pays a steep price.

In this case, nobody lost more than the Bjerk family. They lost a son.

But now the Sweeney family will to spend the next several years waiting for their son to be released from prison.

Whether it is with alcohol or drugs, teens need to realize the severity of their actions.

Teens often do not think of the health consequences when buying or using drugs. They may fear the legal consequences, but they are thinking possession busts only.

There’s no way Wesley Sweeney envisioned that he’d be facing 20 years in prison when he made that drug run.

Our thoughts are with all of the families involved in this terrible tragedy.

Drugged driving has become more prevalent in the United States, and it has even forced groups like MADD to include drugs in its’ anti driving-under-the-influence campaigns.

Sadly, a Houston couple is the latest two people to be killed by a suspected drugged driver.

According to KVUE-TV the couple had made run a run to the service station to fill up on gas.

As they went to return home, their car was struck by another vehicle.

Authorities say the driver of that other car, Theodore Hargrove was driving under the influece of PCP.

Toxicology reports will confirm the department’s preliminary findings, but it won’t bring back the unidentified victims.

Please remember not to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Too many lives are lost each year. They are the innocent victims, killed by drunk or drugged drivers on our roads.

When  you tell a parent that their child could be using drugs, or know someone on drugs, it usually falls on deaf ears.

“Not my kid.”

“Not our schools.”

“Not in our community.”

These three phrases are some of the common responses you get.

Parents don’t want to believe that their child, or a child that they know could be abusing prescription drugs, because they visualize a “strung out junkie” when you refer to opiate abusers.

THE BEST WAY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR TEEN IS DRUG FREE, IS WITH THE HELP OF THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT. DETECTING UP TO 12 DRUGS, THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT NOT ONLY GIVES YOU A PRELIMINARY POSITIVE OR NEGATIVE, BUT HELPS GUIDE FAMILIES BEFORE AND AFTER THE TEST. CLICK HERE FOR AN UP CLOSE LOOK.

But these so-called junkies aren’t long haired, dirty, recluses, who barely make it to school. These kids who are popping pills are school are high school athletes, popular kids, and straight A students.

A police officer in the Houston, Texas area just finished an undercover operation that spanned two years. And the revealed her discoveries to TV station KHOU.

She was on campus and in the classroom the day 16 kids were sickened by prescription drug use. 8 were hospitalized, and paramedics treated another 8 at school.

“There were several kids in my classes, you know, passing the pills and selling them, giving them to each other. Whenever they had consumed them, they were just falling down the stairs, falling out of their seats,” said the officer.

Along with pills, she said cocaine was very popular on high school campuses. Marijuana was the drug of choice, and prevalent, at middle schools.

To watch KHOU’s story, click HERE.

 

It still comes as a shock, when a known long-time drug user dies.   Whitney Houston is no exception.   While the singing legend had spent the last several years in relative obscurity, her known battle with drug addiction not hidden at all.   The pop star was trying to make a comeback, and died just a day before the Grammy awards.   Immediately the rumors started spreading as to why she died.   Officially, we won’t know until the coroner releases that information.    There was speculation that her death was caused by drugs and alcohol, and other speculation that she might have drowned.

CONCERNED YOUR TEEN MAY HAVE TRIED PRESCRIPTION DRUGS?  YOUR NOSE WON’T KNOW IF THEY’VE BEEN USING PILLS.  HOME DRUG TEST YOUR TEEN WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.   AMAZON.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.    CVS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.   WALGREENS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.

Photos taken late last week show Houston looking confused and full of emotion outside a nightclub.   There was obvious speculation as to her degree of intoxication.    Houston set the recording industry by fire.   Discovered by Clive Davis, Houston rocketed to the top of the charts with hit after hit.    Kids these days may not be familiar with much of Houston’s music, most of her most recent work had not fared well.    But Houston was adored by her fans.   Millions are mourning her loss.

Whitney Houston’s death may offer uncomfortable parents an “in” on the drug conversation with their children.   If they are typically uncomfortable talking about drug use with their teenagers, parents can use this tragedy to discuss the dangers.   Whether Houston’s death is connected to prescription drugs or not, her history of drug abuse, and the fact that she had several different medications in her hotel room are strong reasons why parents should discuss the topic with their children.

Among the topics:

  • Painkillers are severely addictive.  Opiates are very difficult to ween off of, and the detox period can be very brutal.
  • Taking pills meant for someone else can have deadly results.   A 13-year old 80 lb teenaged girl taking medicine for a long time, male, 225lb, chronic pain sufferer can be overwhelming.
  • Just because you’ve taken a Xanax or Oxycontin before, doesn’t mean it was the same strength as the pill you will take next time.
  • Pill use can evolve into heroin use in a blink of an eye.   Heroin is easier to get, and it’s cheaper than most painkillers.

Parents need to encourage their kids to talk to them about drugs in the community, and drugs at school.   You want your child to be open with you regarding drugs and alcohol.

Another good option is to talk about home drug testing with your teen.   Parents can say, “I don’t want you to end up like Whitney Houston, Amy Winehouse, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, or Janis Joplin.  I want to drug test you so that we know you stay on the right path.”

The 12-Panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits covers the most popular drug combinations, including opiates, marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, PCP, and many others.