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We have seven weeks left in the year, and already Will County, Illinois has a new record for heroin or opiate related deaths.

So far in 2012, the county has lost 37 people from heroin.

Last year’s total was 30.

Some parents have been taking the lead in trying to educate parents, but there needs to be more involvement.

DON’T BE CAUGHT OFF GUARD. TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS CAN NOT ONLY DETECT EXPERIMENTATION BEFORE IT BECOMES AN ADDICTION, BUT CAN HELP DETER IT. EMPOWER YOUR TEEN TO SAY “NO I CAN’T TRY THAT. MY PARENTS TEST ME.” CLICK HERE FOR INFORMATION.

Parents need to understand that kids are abusing pills because they are accessible, and they turn to heroin when it is necessary to keep the high.

One of the leading voices is John Roberts, who lost his teenaged son to heroin in 2009.

He has been holding community meetings to educate parents that this is happening to our children at an alarming rate.

Parents in the Will County area, and other communities outside of Chicago need to show support and help spread the message that these drugs are killing our kids.

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It’s a small new source, but it makes a very big impression regarding our addiction to opiates.

COULD YOUR TEEN BE TAKING OPIATES? DON’T LET ADDICTION BECOME A UNINVITED GUEST INTO YOUR HOME. CLICK HERE FOR THE QUICK 3 MINUTE TEST.

The Nevada Appeal takes a look at the country’s consumption of high powered narcotics.

You can read the article by clicking here.

 

The OC Register’s OC Mom’s section has a story on the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit, and founder Steve Stahovich.

It highlights Steve’s unfortunate background as a teen addict, but then his much more fortunate background in the treatment field, and his mission today to help families detect early drug use.

A “Parent Tested, Parent Approved” award winner, the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit not only helps detect drug use, but can help guide families during the difficult times with its’ parental support guide.

The parental support guide, written by America’s Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman, provides parents with emotional support on how to talk to their children, the signs to look for, and what to do after a preliminary positive result.

Click HERE to read the OC Register’s article and click HERE for information on the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

The folks at Teensaver Diagnostics try to extend the message to parents that addiction can strike any family at any time.

No amount of money, religion, or social status can prevent it.

The best medicine for averting teen addiction is proactive parenting.

DETECTING TEEN DRUG USE IS EASY WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS. DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR FAMILIES, THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT CAN HELP KEEP YOUR KIDS SAFE FROM DRUG ABUSE.

Drug addicts aren’t bad people. They have a sickness.

Addiction occurs when good people, make bad decisions, and it we are seeing new teen addicts on a daily basis.

Kirk Shaffer shared his story with the OC Register’s David Whiting. You don’t have to live in Orange County to understand Shaffer’s story. It’s being lived out by millions of other people across the country.

Shaffer talked about his addiction to pretty much everything, and it all started with a big box of pills.

I encourage you to read his story, and see how life turned so quickly for a promising young boy. I also encourage you to read more of David Whiting’s stories on the opiate problem in Orange County, as they surely can hit close to your home.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse has created a graphic to show the national levels of drug use. The people at Teensavers thought it would be good to show parents who don’t regularly visit the NIDA site.

Remember, you can’t trust your eyes and nose to see if your teen is on drugs. By the time you can recognize the physical signs, addiction may already be in place.

TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT DETECTS EARLY DRUG USE AND HELPS PARENTS IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM AND STARTS THEM TOWARDS A SOLUTION. CLICK HERE TO GET AN IN DEPTH LOOK AT THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.

Teen drinking isn’t funny. More teens than ever before are becoming binge drinkers.

Here’s a photo making the rounds today and receiving quite a bit of fanfare. It pictures a teen holding a photo with the words “Since I want to post photos of me holding liquor. I am obviously not ready for social media and will be taking a hiatus until I learn what I should and should not post.”

Salute these parents for correcting this teen’s behaviors. Parents should be checking out their children’s social media. Facebook and Twitter aren’t just popular for tech junkies and stay at home moms. Remember, numerous kids in elementary and middle school are using social media to swap photos and interact. There’s a reason why Instagram was just swooped up for a hefty price tag.

One any of these given sites you can look up and see plenty of references about drug use. Kids boast about drinking, parties, drugs, and sneaking everything by their parents.

If they are silly enough to make these mistakes, boasting about doing illegal activites, what else might they try?

Try to keep and eye on the things your teen not only says and does, but posts!

A heartbreaking story out of Ormond Beach, Florida.   A man is accused of coercing a young boy and his friend to dumpster dive for discarded bottles of Methodone.   The group then went back and mixed the residue from the bottles with water to make a drug concoction.   The concoction made the boys numb and nauseated, and eventually they passed out.

Methadone is a synthetic opioid used to help heroin addicts avoid using that drug.

What is troubling is that the medical examiner found traces of Xanax in Bryce’s urine.   The boy had apparently taken a Xanax pill the night before he died.  There’s no indication as to how he got ahold of the pill.

A Parson family friend told the Daytona Beach News-Journal that Bruce did not have a “history of drugs.”

This serves as a lesson to all parents.   If this 14-year-old had done drugs before, his parent clearly knew nothing about it.    If this was his first exprience using drugs, it was also his last.   Parents need to be vigilant and talk to their children about drugs, and Myteensavers recommends a home drug test kit to help confirm that your child is drug-free.

a 12-panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit tests for marijuana, opiates, cocaine, PCP, Ecstasy, Amphetamine, Methamphetamines, Benzodiazepines, Barbiturates, Oxycodone, Methodone, and Tricyclic Antidepressants.

Don’t guess.  Home Drug Test!

 

 

 

 

CNN has a great article out this morning on its’ political ticker.

The most powerful information was on the last line:

Daily, 50 people in our nation die from unintentional prescription opioid overdoses and, daily, 20 times that number are admitted to hospital emergency departments for opioid overdoses,” said John Eadie, director of the Prescription Monitoring Program Center of Excellence at Brandeis University.

That’s a shocking number of deaths and illnesses because of the reckless use of pills.   A good portion of these victim are teens, who think there is little harm in taking a pill.   Of the millions who survive their pill usage, a good portion become addicted to opiates, and they turn to heroin.

Protect your child with a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.    You can get one clicking right HERE.

For the CNN article you can click HERE.

The Senate is taking an aggressive approach to combating the nation’s fastest growing epidemic; Prescription drug abuse.   As Myteensavers has been relaying to parents, more kids are turning to the medicine cabinet than they are the needle.

Yesterday, the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee on crime and terrorism, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI, announced that prescription drug “abuse poses a serious and growing threat to our communities and young people.”

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-OH spoke yesterday about the troubles in his state: “Prescription-drug abuse in Ohio — and our nation — needs to be treated like the epidemic it is,” Brown said. “From the policies to the stories, it’s clear prescription-drug abuse is nonpartisan. It’s clear it is an issue of life or death in too many parts of our nation, especially Ohio.”

Brown promoted a bill that he said would prevent prescription-drug abusers from acquiring excess drugs — which they might abuse or illegally-resell.    This legislation already exists in 20 states.

Gov. John Kasich signed a “pill mill” bill on Friday, and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has gone after those abusing drug prescriptions.

Brown’s office says Ohio is second only to Florida in the number of oxycodone prescriptions filled, and Ohio’s death rate due to unintentional drug poisoning skyrockets 350% from 1999 to 2008.

In 2007, unintentional drug poisoning became the leading cause of accidental death in Ohio, surpassing motor-vehicle crashes and suicide for the first time on record.

Gil Kerlikowske, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, told the panel that the pills were popular because they were easy to get and there was a “low perception of risk.”

Last month, the White House announced plans to crack down on prescription-drug abuse, including putting a priority.

This serves as a reminder for parents to drug test their kids.   A Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit can be a life-saving device in the home.

 

This press release from UNC shows the severity of prescription drug abuse.    If you know someone that needs help, or you need a Teensavers home drug test kit CLICK HERE.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Unintentional overdose deaths in teens and adults have reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. In some 20 states in 2007 the number of unintentional drug poisoning deaths exceeded either motor vehicle crashes or suicides, two of the leading causes of injury death. Prescription opioid pain medications are driving this overdose epidemic. Opioid pain medications were also involved in about 36 percent of all poisoning suicides in the U.S. in 2007.

In a commentary article released ahead of the print version in the April 19, 2011 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, physicians affiliated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center cite data noting that in 2007 unintentional deaths due to prescription opioid pain killers were involved in more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

The new report was co-authored by CDC medical epidemiologist Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH; Richard H. Weisler, MD, adjunct professor of psychiatry at UNC and adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center; and Ashwin A. Patkar, MD, associate professor in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences department at Duke University. More than describing the scope of unintentional prescription opioid overdose deaths, their report is aimed at helping doctors control the problem.

Approximately 27,500 people died from unintentional drug overdoses in 2007, driven to a large extent by prescription opioid overdoses. Dr. Weisler says that to put this in perspective, the number of 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths alone represents tragically about 4.6 times as many deaths as all U.S. fatalities in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from the beginning of both wars through Feb 20, 2011.

Alternatively, the 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths would be equivalent to losing an airplane carrying 150 passengers and crew every day for six months, which clearly would be totally unacceptable from a public health perspective.

The CDC sounded alarms regarding the issue in several reports last year. In June 2010, for example, the agency announced that the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found that 1 in 5 high school students in the United States have abused prescription drugs, including the opioid painkillers OxyContin, Percocet, and Vicodin. Opioids are synthetic versions of opium that are used to treat moderate and severe pain.

And in June last year the CDC reported that visits to hospital emergency departments involving nonmedical use of prescription narcotic pain relievers has more than doubled, rising 111 percent, between 2004 and 2008.

The authors note various reports citing some key factors linked to the problem: increased nonmedical use of opioids without a prescription “… solely for the feeling it causes” and that medical providers, psychiatrists and primary care physicians included, may fail to anticipate among their patients the extent of overlap between chronic pain, mental illness and substance abuse.

For example, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with unipolar, bipolar, anxiety, psychotic, non-psychotic, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders will also have substance abuse problems. Dr. Patkar said, “Similarly, people with substance abuse are more likely to have another mental illness and a significant number of patients with chronic pain will have mental illness or substance abuse problems.”

Moreover, opioids, benzodiazepines, anti-depressants, and sleep aids “are frequently prescribed in combination despite their potentially harmful additive effects,” the authors point out. And it’s the combinations of these drugs that are frequently found in the toxicology reports of people dying of overdoses.

In their recommendations to physicians, the authors suggest that before prescribing opioids, doctors should try non-narcotic medications as well as, when possible, physical therapy, psychotherapy, exercise, and other non-medicinal methods. And that these methods are given “an adequate trial” before moving to opioids.

“It is very important to screen patients with chronic pain who may require opioid therapy for substance abuse and mental health problems, especially depression and other mood and anxiety disorders and address these problems adequately,” they state.