Tag Archive: High school


Twitter can provide a lot of information, and there may be something from Arkansas right now.

Numerous tweets alluded to an apparent mass overdose and drug bust at an Arkansas High School. The students took to twitter to discuss the happenings, and many believed that pills were the cause of the drama.

We will have more details as they surface. This apparently in or near the community of Batesville.

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Last fall, ESPN the magazine reported that numerous college athletes across the country engage in regular drug use.

Highlighted was the University of Oregon and the marijuana culture on campus.

At the time, numerous former players were asked what percentage of players used marijuana.

The answer was somewhere between 40 and 60 percentage. Current players agreed that the assessment would apply to current members of the Ducks football rosters.

Now, as the PAC-12 season in underway, those players will be under a little more scrutiny at the University.

That’s because Oregon’s athletic department spent the summer fine-tuning a new drug policy that would subject athletes to random tests year-round, even during the summer.

So far the tests have no begun, but it will be interesting to see if any players are caught by the new system.

The university is not doing anything that already isn’t being done in the pros. All professional sports leagues screen for performance enhancing drugs and illicit drugs.

High Schools across the country are trying to establish random testing, but it often is met by parents who are against the plans.

Ultimately, these athletes will need to test if they are good enough to play professional sports.

It’s good to see the University of Oregon work to identify, contain, and dissipate the marijuana culture on campus.

Astoria High School in Oregon and its’ football team has been rocked by an alcohol and drug scandal, and several dozen students may be implicated.

The initial discovery of the events, at a team camp-out, resulted in the the forfeiture of three games, and a closer look by school and police officials.

School administrators say up to 28 players may have been involved, drinking alcohol or smoking marijuana. All will face disciplinary action, including community service work on the next three game days.

Not all of the kids were found to have used drugs or alcohol but were also busted for not notifying administrators.

The camp-out was attended by Head Coach Howard Rub and assistant Fa’aleo Poyer.

The coach and school officials say that the primary focus is not on football, but the use of illicit substances.

The coaching staff says that they were unaware of the alcohol and drug use as they went to sleep between two and three in the morning.

The police might also get involved to find out who provided the alcohol and marijuana.

This case serves as a reminder that this isn’t an isolated incident. Kids in all communities are experimenting and using alcohol and drugs.

Parents need to remember that just because an adult or parent is present, that it doesn’t mean that kids will abstain from drugs.

This is where the Teensavers Home Drug Test comes in. The Teensavers home drug test detects marijuana, cocaine, opiates – including heroin, oxycodone, benzopdiazepines, barbiturates, TCAs, PCP, ecstasy, methadone, methamphetamine, and amphetamines.

To get a look at the total solution, click on the box.

A high school football coach who tried to come clean with his players about his drug related history, felt the wrath from the kids’ parents.

ABC6 in Williamsport, PA reported the story which involved a coach facing accusations that he stole medications during visits to players’ homes.

The school stood by football coach Scott Keller. The superintendent allowed him to speak before players about the accusations.

Many of the parents didn’t approve.

How would you feel?

You can read about the story by clicking HERE.

Just how comfortable are children around drugs?  Very comfortable. They use them, and buy and sell them on middle and high school campuses across the country.

PARENTS MUST STAND STRONG AGAINST THIS GROWING TEEN TREND OF DRUG USE AND DRUG POSSESSION. CLICK HERE FOR ALL THE HELP YOU NEED.

The latest bust saw 8 teens put in handcuffs by police in Florida.

It was another “21 jump street” type investigation where undercover officers posed as students.

Once befriending them, they found the drug connections on the campuses of Palm Beach Central High in Wellington Florida.

The students were all charged with selling marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school. With texting and each teen possessing a cellphone, drug deals are made frequently in the classroom.

Unfortunately, these kids are brazen and have no fear of the potential legal ramifications of getting caught. They are concerned with two things; getting high, and making a profit.

This is when parents need to be involved the most. They need to talk to kids about the dangers of drugs and the legal implications of buying, selling, or possessing drugs.

Home drug testing is also a way to make sure that teens are drug free. Teen addicts in treatment tell myteensavers that they had little reinforcement of the anti-drug message at home. Remember, drug use for the first time typically occurs with someone they know and someone they trust!

Drug use at an Exeter New Hampshire high school previous dance has caused the principal to eliminate dances at the school.

DONT GAMBLE ON YOUR TEEN’S BIG NIGHT OUT. HAVE CONFIDENCE BY KEEPING A TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT ON THE COUNTER. IT STARTS WORKING, THE MINUTE YOU SHOW IT TO YOUR TEEN.

The prom is still on, besides that, the kids will have no more dances at Exeter High School. The school’s principal VIctor Sokul just doesn’t believe that school dances are safe anymore.

He cites the school’s previous dance and seven violations for drinking and drug use.

Some current students, and their parents, are outraged by the move.

This is a reminder to parents that proms and other dances are not open invitations for teens to experiment with alcohol and drugs. Many times a parent or relative will supply the alcohol for the teens.

On dance nights, communicate with other parents in the group. Ask your teens questions. Do not allow them to get a limo or hotel. Make sure they are supervised throughout the night.

Most teens use the guise of a school dance for a night of drinking and drug use. They made show up, eat dinner, and snap a photo, then they are gone. They go back to the hotel where they prepartied, and continue fueling their intoxication.

Don’t gamble on your teen’s future.

A community is mourning the loss of an 18-year-old student, who died earlier this week.

Students at Carmel High School observed a moment of silence for student Michael Kastle. According to authorities, the Kent, NY teen may have died of a prescription drug overdose.

MAKE SURE YOUR TEENS KNOW THAT PRESCRIPTION DRUGS CAN KILL. DISCUSS DRUGS WITH YOUR CHILDREN AND HOME DRUG TEST TO ENSURE THEY ARE DRUG-FREE. CLICK HERE FOR THE 5-MINUTE TEST THAT’S MADE FOR YOUR FAMILY.

Two friends had brought him to the emergency room in an unresponsive state, and the LoHud.com news site indicated that investigators were looking at the possibility that Xanax was involved. Investigators are believe that Kastle may have “exhibited signs indicating that he might have taken an excessive dose.”

Kastle’s friends took the boy to the hospital around 9:30 a.m. after they were unable to wake him from his sleep.

Police stressed that any conclusive findings must await toxicology results.

Sheriff Donald Smith called Kastle’s death a “terrible tragedy for the entire community.”

Carmel High School students returned from spring break Tuesday to a moment of silence and brief announcement about Kastle’s death.

Kastle’s obituary also appeared in the Lohud.com:

Michael Walter Kastle, of Carmel, NY, passed away on Sunday, April 8, 2012 a the age of 18. Mike was born on April 1, 1994 in Sleepy Hollow, NY. He lived in Mahopac for six years and in Carmel for the remainder of his life. Mike loved dirt bike riding, cars, and his dog, Buddy. he had a passion and aptitude for mechanics, aspiring to be an auto mechanic after graduating from high school in June. A young man with a big heart, he will be greatly missed by his loving family and many friends.

Mike is survived by his parents, Barbara and Matt Kastle of Carmel and Mahopac, NY, respectively; his brother, Jeff, also of Carmel; Aunt Rhona and cousins, Nathan and Libby Kastle of San Jose, CA; Aunt Suzy Bone of Stamford, CT; Uncle Jim Bone of Altamont, NY; and Aunt Peg, Uncle Tom, and cousins, Sarah and David Bone of Guilderland, NY.

Visitation will be held at Balsamo-Cordovano Funeral Home, 15 Church Street, Carmel, NY 10512. Phone: (845) 225-2144, on Wednesday, April 10 from 5-8pm. Online condolences may be offered in the Book of Memories at www.BalsamoCordovanoFuneralHome.com.

This is a tragic loss for his family and the community.

For whatever reason, that also seems really unexplainable, parents do not or will not talk about drug use with their kids.   Many of them think that the anti-drinking and anti-drug message is implied. 

COULD YOUR TEEN BE TALKING ABOUT DRUGS RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU?   IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF THE CODE WORDS THAT TEENS ARE USING FOR DRUGS, CHECKOUT THE “FOR THE FAMLY” SECTION ON MYTEENSAVERS.COM BY CLICKING HERE.

We all know that isn’t the case.

Kids probably hear and see a few dozen instances of drinking and drug use being glorified to every one message that reiterates the harm and dangers of drugs.

Kids see drinking and drugs in movies, television shows, and can hear about it in music.   They also hear about it socially.   Monday morning high school chatter typically consists of the weekend high school football game, and which teen had thrown up after a severe night of partying.

High schoolers know who the partiers are.    The drinking, smoking, and drug use is often glamorized by the “popular” teens.    Rappers tout their marijuana use, and  celebrities celebrate their pill addictions.    Despite the fact that drugs have claimed the lives of numerous actors and singers, the drug use is still glamorized.

Kids now have the ability to glamorize it through YouTube pages, FaceBook accounts, blogs, and other social media that allows them to post photos and information anonymously.      Foolishly, some kids even post the photos and video of themselves acting silly drinking too much or using drugs.   Here are just a few winners pulled off of eBay.   (Disclaimer, people seen in the videos below may not be minors — but are being used to show the typical behavior described above)

Chances are the people seen in these videos were 18 or older, but they may not have been 21.    Those kids talking about the one teen’s marijuana use looked to be high schoolers.  

Parents can learn from these videos.   Obviously, when they are posted anonymously, it’s hard to find them.   But checking your teen’s facebook, myspace, or mobile phone for photos or references to drug use could help parents.

Stumbling onto experimentation before it becomes addiction is critical to helping a teen witha drug problem.  

Another way you can detect teen drug use is to use home drug test kits.   The newest test on the market is the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit. 

The Test is available at through many trusted retailers.       All 5 Teensavers Home Drug Tests, including the 12-panel which detects marijuana, cocaine, PCP, ecstasy, opiates, Benzodiazepines, Barbiturates, Amphetamines, Methamphetamine, Methadone, Oxycodone, and TCA’s are currently on SALE at CVS.com.   The 5 teests can also be bought at Amazon.com,  and the Drugstore.com.   Walgreens customers can get 1-panel 3-panel 7-panel or 12-panel tests at Walgreens.com.

A compelling and controversial story out of Mlive.com this morning. It is raising the eyebrows of some parents and the ACLU. The plan involves paying high schoolers $50 to rat out their classmates who are using drugs.

DON’T LEAVE IT UP TO ANOTHER TEEN. HAVE PEACE OF MIND THAT YOUR TEEN IS DRUG FREE WITH THE HELP OF A TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT. CVS.COM SHOPPERS CLICK HERE. WALGREENS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.

What do you think? Is this a good plan? Will this lead to numerous false accusations? Will this put “tattle-tale” teens in a position to be retaliated against?

One one hand, it seems like this would hold teens accountable to their peers. But it just may not be the right answer for the school.

Parents should be taking more responsibility and talking to their teens about the dangers of drugs. This conversation should be open and honest, and should be frequent between parents and kids.

Parents should also consider having a home drug test kit on hand at home, just in case that first warning sign appears. Marijuana is readily accessible to children and teens now get their hands on pills, high powered opiates, from the family medicine cabinet. Don’t fuel your teens habit with unattended pills at home.

New information from the University of Maryland. Liberty Mutual, and SADD.

Nearly
All 11th and 12th Graders Believe Their Peers Are More Likely to Drink
and Drive on Prom and Graduation Nights; Less Than One-Third Think
Driving on These Nights is Dangerous.

Students may be more likely
to drink and drive on prom and graduation nights, according to a survey
of 11th and 12th grade students across the country. Nearly all of the
students surveyed (90%) said that their peers are more likely to drink
and drive on prom night, and 79% report the same for graduation night.
Despite this belief, students do not seem to think that driving on these
nights is dangerous. Less than one-third (29%) reported that they
believe that driving on prom night comes with a high degree of danger,
and 25% said the same for graduation night. These findings suggest that
there is a need to provide high school students with prevention messages
that paint an accurate picture of the risks and consequences from
drinking and driving during prom and graduation season.

NOTES: The
survey was conducted by ORC Guideline for Liberty Mutual and Students
Against Destructive Decisions (SADD). A total of 2,531 11th and 12th
graders from 25 randomly recruited high schools across the country were
surveyed in the Fall of 2009. The margin of error is +/- 1.7 percent.