Tag Archive: Gateway drug theory


Since voters in Washington and Colorado approved marijuana legalization legislation last month, many people, including world leaders, questioned whether the war on drugs is still effective.

The Atlantic takes a look at the notion today.

It’s interesting when you think of the quality factor. The fact that pot smokers are now much more of connoisseurs of cannabis, and not just grass smokers plays a big role in the war on drugs.

How do you battle the war on drugs in your home? Teensavers helps discover experimentation.

Whether legalized or not, or allowed for medicinal purposes, the number one factor is delivering a message to children that marijuana is harmful for the brains of adolescents.

You can slice the legalization argument 10 ways on why it should be taxed and sold in America, but the bottom line is that kids can never think that it is OK to smoke.

Recent studies showed adults who smoked marijuana with kids, and continued with regularity through adulthood, showed a loss of IQ.

The threat to a developing young brain is monumental.

Too many people spout that marijuana is a harmless drug, and that nobody has ever died from using marijuana.

But teen who smoke can pay the price with their brain development, and marijuana can be a gateway drug for young users.

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The debate has raged for years whether or not marijuana is the gateway drug.

It depends on which study you believe.

Recently a Journal of School Health article indicated that alcohol was the substance that led young users towards other drugs.

The study, which crunched the numbers of the University of Michigan’s Monitoring the Future Survey, indicated that marijuana was not the culprit.

Now Yale University researchers have released a study which contradicts those claims.

Using the numbers from SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) studies from 2006, 2007, and 2008.

The Yale researchers looked at 55,215 18- to 25-year-olds.

6,496, about 12 percent, reported that they were abusing prescription opioids.

Of the group abusing these drugs, about 57 percent had used alcohol, 56 percent had smoked cigarettes and 34 percent had used marijuana.

The study found that, among both men and women, those who had used marijuana were 2.5 times more likely than those their age who abstained to later dabble in prescription drugs.

Also, young men who drank alcohol or smoked cigarettes were 25 percent more likely to abuse prescription opioids.

The study didn’t show any relation between alcohol or cigarette use in young women and later use of prescription drugs.

Of course, marijuana advocates are blasting the study, saying that it is just anti-cannabis propaganda.

But parents can have their say.

There are millions of teens abusing prescription drugs, and millions more using marijuana.

Not all marijuana users turn to harder drugs, but talk to those using more dangerous drugs and they will tell you, they started with marijuana.

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Teensavers wanted to alert you to a heartbreaking story this morning in the Daily Herald that hopefully will open your eyes to the growing teen and young adult drug problem here in America.

Chelsea Laliberte’s reveals her struggle with her brother’s addiction, and it how it spiraled out of control until it took his life.

DON’T LOSE A CHILD THINKING THEY ARE DRUG FREE, OR ASSUMING THEY ARE ONLY USING ALCOHOL AND MARIJUANA. DEATH IS NOT A PLEASANT SURPRISE. CLICK HERE FOR THE TOTAL SOLUTION FOR YOUR FAMILY.

She made desperate pleas to her family that her brother Alex was using more than alcohol and marijuana. They didn’t listen.

Now she’s on a mission to alert parents about the growing heroin problem in the suburbs and how listening to siblings can make a big difference.

Siblings can be key in catching experimentation before it becomes addiction. There are many who won’t speak up, but the ones who do, should be listened to.

A recent study shows that alcohol is more of a gateway drug than marijuana, which is very troubling. Numerous teens drink and many parents dismiss it as a rite of passage.

But when drinking at 13 or 14, evolves into marijuana use at 14 and 15, teens often begin to get curious about other substances before they even graduate high school.

Parents need to have frequent conversations with their teens about all kinds of drugs, from alcohol and mairjuana, to cocaine and heroin. Kids are abusing pills, and once addicted to opiates, the often turn to heroin.

Some use amphetamines or methamphetamine to get that high, and others use club drugs like ecstasy, thinking it’s a safer alternative to alcohol.

Teensavers Home drug Tests can detect all of these substances up to 72 hours. Parents would be wise to keep one on hand.

It empowers teens to say no, when asked by their friends to do drugs.   40% say they try for the first time, because they didn’t know how to reject the peer pressure.