Tag Archive: Charlie Sheen


It’s the image ravers hate. They are all a bunch of drug-using mushheads.

Even the LA Weekly took a shot at this blog when Teensavers reminded parents to exercise caution when it comes to teens attending raves. Now Teensavers didn’t allude to the fact that everyone that attends these events are on drugs. The Teensavers teams wanted to remind parents of some of the younger attendees that drugs are used at these events.

While raves are supposed to be 18 and over only crowds, some minors do sneak in. A rave in Los Angeles saw that first hand. At the Electric Daisy Carnival in 2010, a 15-year-old girl died of a drug overdose. LA leaders called for a crackdown.

But not all ravers use drugs. Many go and enjoy the music and the lights and the activity drug free. And some musical acts are outspoken about the linking of music festivals and drug use.

Case in point: The Ultra Music Festival in Miami. Madonna was there to introduce Avicii. Trying to keep herself relevant and hip with the younger crowd, she asked, “how many of you have seen Molly?”

Molly isn’t a singer on the bill. Molly is slang for Ecstasy. And while some of the crowd let out a roar, it didn’t leave everyone in the dance community laughing.

Deadmau5, one of the hottest acts on the planet, didn’t like what Madge had to say. In fact, the star (real name Joel Zimmerman) lashed out at Madonna via his Twitter and Facebook accounts.

“Very classy there madonna. “HUR DUR HAS ANYONE SEEN MOLLY???” such a great message for the young music lovers at ultra, Quite the f’n philanthropist. but hey, at least yer HIP AND TRENDY! fucking cant smack my head hard enough right now.”

The Huffington Post posted an exchange between the musical producer and a fan. You can read it HERE. The fan called him out asking him where he’d be without ecstasy. Zimmerman didn’t skip a beat saying “i’d give up my entire career to remove the fucking rampant stupidity thats plagued my favorite type of music in an INSTANT.”

It’s good to see that some of the popular people in a genre stand up and speak out against drug use. Imagine if we saw the biggest names in TV and movies follow Deadmau5’s lead? It might be refreshing. Instead we still have movie and TV stars who are the poster children for drug use like Seth Rogan and Charlie Sheen.

It certainly would be nice if someone of stature like Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie came out and say that the Pitts are against pill abuse or heroin is for has-beens. It would be magnificent if Justin Bieber told his millions of fans that drugs will never be cool. Deadmau5 may not be a household name, but to dance fans, he’s well-known.

It’s great to see him relay a positive anti-drug message!

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25 years ago, “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” hit theaters. The movie detailed the story of three teens who have an adventurous day playing hooky. But despite some deception with faking an illness, and a little joyriding in a classic car, the kids sat at a baseball game, went to a parade, and enjoyed a gourmet meal. They didn’t ditch class to raid the liquor cabinet and they weren’t doped up at the Cubs game. Abe Froman wouldn’t even frown on their the behavior of these 17-year-olds. The movie is a classic, and aside from Charlie Sheen’s jail-bound character, which was a great foreshadow of how his real-life would be, the kids stay out of trouble.

How times have changed.

Behind the laughs of the new movie “Project X”, is a serious subject.

It centers around three high schoolers who try to throw the greatest birthday bash of all-time. Who knew that the 17th birthday was the one designated to be celebrated with alcohol, drugs, and nudity? And of course, when nearly 2,000 kids show up, chaos ensues.

This antics in this movie could make the characters in “Old School” blush.

While the movie is rated R, kids who are younger than 18 will undoubtedly sneak into theaters to get a look at this movie, which in trailers looks somewhat funny.

But what message will teens take away from this? If you have a party loaded with alcohol and drugs, you can get laid easily? Funny stuff happens when you are drunk and high?

Moviegoers will likely enjoy this film, and given the fact that good comedies don’t come around very often, it could become the next classic comedy.

BUMP, JUMBOS, MAC AND CHEESE: DO YOU KNOW THE LATEST STREET TERMS FOR DRUGS? GET THE CHEAT SHEET TO DECODE THE DRUG TALK IN YOUR HOME BY CLICKING HERE.

But parents need to remember to talk to their kids about drugs and alcohol after they’ve seen this movie. Oscar Wilde once said “Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life.” So while this movie may not be a portrayal of how high school teens typically act, it could inspire them to throw a bash like this.

And if they do, they might find that they don’t need a flame-thrower to get burned.

It is a hotly debated proposal.   A new bill would require parents to
drug test their children in order to keep them in school.   Long Island
lawmaker Assemblyman Joseph Saladino (R-Massapequa)  introduced the
bill this week.   The bill would force parents to sign a statement
swearing they had tested their children annually.   The students tested
would be high schoolers, grades 9th through 12th.   The results would
not be relayed to school administrators.

The Teensavers Team
applauds Saladino for his efforts.  After all, parents who discover that
their child is using a substance, can help correct the problem.
Oftentimes, a teenagers habit becomes a full blown addiction before
loved ones find out.   Treating the problem at that point can be
difficult.

While we always encourage parents to use drug tests to
help ensure that their kids are clean, there are a few problems we see
with this bill.  First, testing only once a year doesn’t do a whole
lot.   If you test your teen in January, they have another 10 months of
potential substance abuse.    The key to home drug testing is regular
and random.   Your teen should know that they could be tested at any
time, but at no specific time.  This also helps prevent a kid from
possessing substitute urine or a masking agent handy.

The other
problem we have with the bill is that it starts with 8th grades.
14-years-old is not the entry age for drug use.   SAMHSA stats say that
2500 children experiement with drugs for the first time every day, and
some of them are as young as 8-years-old.   This policy would work
better for children grades 6th and up.    Now you are looking at 11 and
12-year-olds, who may just be experimenting with marijuana or other
controlled substances.   Early detection is key when trying to cutoff a
growing drug problem.  By high school, kids have more means to find
masking agents, or find someone to provide them with a urine sample.

Teensavers believes that Saladino is on the right path.   He told CBS2 in New York,

“We want to make sure that parents have the tools
they need to determine if there’s an addiction problem with a serious
drug — we’re talking heroin, barbiturates, opiates — the kinds of drugs
that lead to death,” Saladino said.

He claimed the bill is designed to assist parents.

“Once
a teen becomes 18-years-old, they’re an adult, and parents lose all
control of the situation and are not able to get them into rehab,” Saladino said. “This helps parents identify the problem early.”

We
believe Saladino is working towards a great plan to help keep kids off
drugs.   What we are proud to see is that he responded after a series of
heroin deaths in his community.   Many lawmakers are not doing much to
help fight this surging drug problem.

Hopefully Saladino can wake up the parents of these kids, and let them know that this threat is for real.

 

 

 

It’s the latest controversy:

Lance
Armstrong is no stranger to drug testing. His camp recently tweeted
that throughout his cycling career, he’s had more than 500 drug controls
(drug tests) and no positives. He is still fighting off accusations
from other cyclists who claim they’ve seen him using performance
enhancing drugs.

Whether or not you are concerned about PEDs,
marijuana, or prescription drugs, drug testing is a serious conversation
to have with your teen.     But it’s smaller impersonal discussions
about drug use and drug testing that will get the parents on the same
page as kids.   This is the least confrontational kids to go.   Parents
shouldn’t be afraid to talk to their kids about drugs.   Otherwise they
might listen to someone else’s message that drugs are OK.

If you want to know more about the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit, A Parent Tested Parent Approved winner, click  HERE.

This press release from UNC shows the severity of prescription drug abuse.    If you know someone that needs help, or you need a Teensavers home drug test kit CLICK HERE.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Unintentional overdose deaths in teens and adults have reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. In some 20 states in 2007 the number of unintentional drug poisoning deaths exceeded either motor vehicle crashes or suicides, two of the leading causes of injury death. Prescription opioid pain medications are driving this overdose epidemic. Opioid pain medications were also involved in about 36 percent of all poisoning suicides in the U.S. in 2007.

In a commentary article released ahead of the print version in the April 19, 2011 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, physicians affiliated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center cite data noting that in 2007 unintentional deaths due to prescription opioid pain killers were involved in more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

The new report was co-authored by CDC medical epidemiologist Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH; Richard H. Weisler, MD, adjunct professor of psychiatry at UNC and adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center; and Ashwin A. Patkar, MD, associate professor in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences department at Duke University. More than describing the scope of unintentional prescription opioid overdose deaths, their report is aimed at helping doctors control the problem.

Approximately 27,500 people died from unintentional drug overdoses in 2007, driven to a large extent by prescription opioid overdoses. Dr. Weisler says that to put this in perspective, the number of 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths alone represents tragically about 4.6 times as many deaths as all U.S. fatalities in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from the beginning of both wars through Feb 20, 2011.

Alternatively, the 2007 U.S. unintentional drug poisoning deaths would be equivalent to losing an airplane carrying 150 passengers and crew every day for six months, which clearly would be totally unacceptable from a public health perspective.

The CDC sounded alarms regarding the issue in several reports last year. In June 2010, for example, the agency announced that the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found that 1 in 5 high school students in the United States have abused prescription drugs, including the opioid painkillers OxyContin, Percocet, and Vicodin. Opioids are synthetic versions of opium that are used to treat moderate and severe pain.

And in June last year the CDC reported that visits to hospital emergency departments involving nonmedical use of prescription narcotic pain relievers has more than doubled, rising 111 percent, between 2004 and 2008.

The authors note various reports citing some key factors linked to the problem: increased nonmedical use of opioids without a prescription “… solely for the feeling it causes” and that medical providers, psychiatrists and primary care physicians included, may fail to anticipate among their patients the extent of overlap between chronic pain, mental illness and substance abuse.

For example, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with unipolar, bipolar, anxiety, psychotic, non-psychotic, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders will also have substance abuse problems. Dr. Patkar said, “Similarly, people with substance abuse are more likely to have another mental illness and a significant number of patients with chronic pain will have mental illness or substance abuse problems.”

Moreover, opioids, benzodiazepines, anti-depressants, and sleep aids “are frequently prescribed in combination despite their potentially harmful additive effects,” the authors point out. And it’s the combinations of these drugs that are frequently found in the toxicology reports of people dying of overdoses.

In their recommendations to physicians, the authors suggest that before prescribing opioids, doctors should try non-narcotic medications as well as, when possible, physical therapy, psychotherapy, exercise, and other non-medicinal methods. And that these methods are given “an adequate trial” before moving to opioids.

“It is very important to screen patients with chronic pain who may require opioid therapy for substance abuse and mental health problems, especially depression and other mood and anxiety disorders and address these problems adequately,” they state.

It’s the best $40 you can spend to keep your child free from drugs. Winner of the Parent Tested Parent Approved award, the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit is helping families stay clean. More info: Click HERE

Americans are rejoicing the elimination of the world’s number one terrorist.    Osama Bin Laden and his forces terrorized the world.  The most devastating day, of course, was September 11th.

The move to eradicate Bin Laden was a move to protect our future.      unfortunately, many Americans take their future for granted.   Most people (including a big percentage of those celebrants in Times Square and outside the White House) hadn’t thought about Osama Bin Laden in a very long time.      There was a general complacency in society.   Today people are cheering, but some time in the next week or so terrorism will fall into the back of their minds.

Drug use is like terrorism.   It is around constantly, it is deadly, and it can strike at any time.     Many parents may briefly ponder teen alcohol and drug use, but they don’t take it seriously.    They need to send a message.     Parents need to be pro-active.  They need family intelligence.   Parents first should be vigilant by asking questions.   Communication is key.

But there’s a weapon they should also use.   A home drug test is like the parents’ version of Navy Seals.     It protects the future of your teen.    If there is an issue, you detect it and eliminate it as soon as possible.

The correlation may be silly, but the issues are not.  Drug addiction is a serious problem.   Days before authorizing the attack on Bin Laden, the President’s office released a write-up on the epidemic of teen prescription abuse.     2500 kids try drugs for the first time every day.      The statistics are real.   The threat is real.

Click here for the answer to protecting your family.

For immediate information: click HERE

It is no coincidence that we are hearing a lot of stories nationwide about teens who lost their lives to prescription drug abuse.     With the recently President Obama proclaimed National Take Back Day, the requests, pleas, and begging for an end to this crisis has grown louder.

The DEA along with various local city and state police, fire, medical, and religious organization is asking for adults to dispose of unused or expired OTC and Prescription medications.

Every pill and liquid that is removed from the home, creates a safer environment for our children to grow up.

The latest victim that I read about, Connor, a young Utah boy who died last December after an overdose.    You can read about it here: http://fb.me/y8BPa17b

It’s a story with a different name, and a different place, but a common problem; prescription medication.

This kid wasn’t a runaway, and he wasn’t out partying on the streets til 2AM, well past curfew.

Little Connor was playing basketball and ice skating and had dinner at a friend’s house.   The later watched the end of a movie at home with his mother.

In the morning, he was dead.

It’s not a different story from another death late last year.   Two teens playing rock band at home until 3AM.   The parents not upset and glee and laughter coming from their son’s room.   Afterall, their son and his best friend weren’t out at a party.   They had a fun night at home with their parents a few rooms away.   Sadly, the parents the next day found the teen guest dead.   The boys had been using prescription drugs.

There are far too many stories in society.   These aren’t bad kids.   These are children who make a bad choice.   Sometimes it’s just one mistake that leads them to the grave.

Myteensavers.com urges parents to take part in the Take Back day.     Spend 5-10 minutes locating all old medicines, and take them to a proper collection spot in your neighborhood.

Yes, some kids will still use methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol.   Saturday’s effort may not change that.     But prescription drug abuse is an epidemic.     Kids choose pills second to marijuana.   The threat and the danger is real.

Myteensavers.com also encourages home drug testing.   A 12-panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit will screen for many dangerous drugs including marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, methamphetamine, opiates, PCP, benzodiazapines, barbiturates, trcicyclic acids, Oxycodone, methadone, Ecstasy (MDMA)

You can get a kit here

Myteensavers.com has been communicating with parents, telling them that pills are a problem.    Unfortunately America is in a stir over President Obama’s birth certificate.  But more importantly, the White House is sending out its own message about the devastation of opiates.

Here is the government press release!

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION RELEASES ACTION PLAN TO ADDRESS NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE EPIDEMIC;
ANNOUNCES FDA ACTION REQUIRING DRUG MAKERS TO DEVELOP EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR PRESCRIBERS ABOUT SAFE USE OF OPIOIDS

New Strategy Strikes Balance between Cracking down on Drug Diversion and Protecting Delivery of Effective Pain Management

Washington, D.C.—Today, Gil Kerlikowske, White House Director of National Drug Control Policy; Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Services, Howard Koh, M.D.; Food and Drug Administration Commissioner, Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.; and DEA Administrator, Michele M. Leonhart released the Obama Administration’s comprehensive action plan to address the national prescription drug abuse epidemic and announced new Federal requirements aimed at educating the medical community about proper prescribing practices.

The Administration’s Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis provides a national framework for reducing prescription drug diversion and abuse by supporting the expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs, recommending more convenient and environmentally responsible disposal methods to remove unused medications from the home, supporting education for patients and healthcare providers, and reducing the prevalence of pill mills and doctor shopping through enforcement efforts. The plan is the culmination of six months of collaboration across the Federal government, with agencies including the Departments of Justice, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and others.

In support of the action plan, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced that it is requiring an Opioids Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). The new program will require manufacturers of long-acting and extended-release opioids to provide educational programs to prescribers of these medications, as well as materials prescribers can use when counseling patients about the risks and benefits of opioid use. The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 gave FDA the authority to require manufacturers to develop and implement a REMS to ensure the benefits of a drug or biological product outweigh its risks.

“Today we are making an unprecedented commitment to combat the growing problem of prescription drug abuse,” said Vice President Biden. “The Government, as well as parents, patients, health care providers, and manufacturers all play a role in preventing abuse. This plan will save lives, and it will substantially lessen the burden this epidemic takes on our families, communities, and workforce.”

“The toll our Nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic has taken in communities nationwide is devastating ,” said Director Kerlikowske. “We share a responsibility to protect our communities from the damage done by prescription drug abuse. This plan will build upon our already unprecedented efforts to coordinate a national response to this public health crisis by addressing the threat at the Federal, state, and local level.”

“Abuse of prescription drugs, especially opioids, represents an alarming public health crisis.” said Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H. Assistant Secretary for Health. “This Plan, which coordinates a public health approach with a public safety approach, offers hope and health to our Nation.”

“Unintentional drug overdose is a growing epidemic in the US and is now the leading cause of injury death in 17 states,” CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said. “There are effective and emerging strategies out there to address this problem. Support for this action plan will help us implement those strategies which will go a long way to save lives and reduce the tremendous burden this problem has on our healthcare system and our society.”

“Long-acting and extended-release opioid drugs have benefit when used properly and are a necessary component of pain management for certain patients, but we know that they pose serious risks when used improperly, with serious negative consequences for individuals, families, and communities,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “The prescriber education component of this Opioid REMS balances the need for continued access to these medications with stronger measures to reduce their risks.”

“DEA is committed to implementing this important and much needed action plan to reduce the demand for prescription drugs, enforce our nation’s drug laws, and take back unneeded prescription drugs,” said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. “When abused, prescription drugs are just as dangerous and just as addictive as drugs like methamphetamine or heroin. The more we can do to stop the abuse of prescription drugs, the more effective we will be in reducing the death, destruction and despair that accompanies all drug abuse.”

Prescription drug abuse is our Nation’s fastest-growing drug problem. The number of people who have unintentionally overdosed on prescription drugs now exceeds the number who overdosed during the crack cocaine epidemic of the 1980’s and the black tar heroin epidemic of the 1970’s combined. In 2007, approximately 27,000 people died from unintentional drug overdoses, driven mostly by prescription drugs. Additionally, a ccording to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the number of Americans in 2009 aged 12 and older currently abusing pain relievers has increased by 20 percent since 2002. Further, visits by individuals to hospital emergency rooms involving the misuse or abuse of pharmaceutical drugs have doubled over the past five years.

ONDCP is coordinating an unprecedented government-wide public health approach to reduce drug use and its consequences in the United States . This effort includes requesting an increase in funding for drug prevention by $123 million and treatment programs by $99 million dollars for Fiscal Year 2012, to train and engage primary health care to intervene in emerging cases of drug abuse, expand and improve specialty care for addiction—including care for families and veterans, and to better manage drug-related offenders in community corrections.

To read the full Action Plan, click here.

To read the FDA’s Opioids Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS), click here.

To get involved in DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Initiative, click here.

Curious about which home drug test to use with your teens?

Many parents looking for the fastest answers often by unreliable, foreign made, cheap products on places like Ebay, craigslist, and from companies that are huge clearing houses for almsot expired medical supplies.

But what are you really getting with that $2 home drug test?

Drug levels on the test panels can be set at any cutoff.   Here’s what you don’t want; Foreign made products that have cutoff levels so high and so random, that you don’t get a successful tests.    Do you want a false negative?     If you make the decision to test your teen, it will be a difficult one.      Don’t trust your an unreliable product.

Teensavers tests are made in the USA.    They hold to governmental cutoff levels.    They are FDA approved.    The levels are strict and consistent.    When grocery shopping, there’s a reason why you don’t buy the $.99 product, and you spend the extra dollars on brand you can trust.    The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits are a family brand.    They deliver more than answers.   They help your family through the process of being a drug free family.

Sure you can find a saliva based test from China on Ebay for $2.    But did you know that the government drug agencies strongly encourage that all saliva drug tests be backed up with a urine test?   Why take two tests?

Do the right thing for your family.    These are your loved ones, who you cherish and want to see thrive in life.

Get the right thing for your family.    Buy the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit with confidence.