Tag Archive: Bath Salt


A story out of Utica that surrounds a teenager and his alert father who called authorities after the teen had frightening reaction from taking a variety of drugs.

According to the Utica Dispatch Observer, the teen took a combination of bath salts, PCP, LSD, and cocaine.

The father sat with the teen and was concerned after the teen cut his leg so he could taste his own blood and declared thoughts of ripping babies apart so that he can eat them.  He called authorities and waited for them to arrive.

Scary behavior, and this can be the outcome after taking a mix of high powered drugs.

Keep your teens clean and away from drugs and alcohol.

 

The federal government took another step towards eliminating synthetic drugs as President Obama signed a federal law Monday banning the sale of bath salts, synthetic marijuana and other synthetic drugs across the nation.

The new drug legislation aims at finally halting the sales of the deadly chemical compounds marketed and sold as bath salts and incense.

Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) hopes the move results in the complete elimination of the products.

“President Obama’s swift approval of this federal ban is the final nail in the coffin for the legal sale of bath salts in smoke shops and convenient stores in New York State and throughout the rest of the country,” Schumer said. “This law will close loopholes that have allowed manufacturers to circumvent local and state bans and ensure that you cannot simply cross state lines to find these deadly bath salts, and I’m pleased that after a great deal of effort, it has become law.”

But will the new man deter chemists from attempting to find alternate combinations?

Schumer’s legislation will specifically ban MDPV (methylenedioxypyrovalerone) and mephedrone.

The chemical mimic the effects caused by cocaine and methamphetamine, including hallucinations, paranoia, and suicidal thoughts.

The law will make bath salts illegal in the U.S. by adding the active ingredients, MDPV and mephedrone, to Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, which classifies drugs that are illegal and cannot be prescribed under any circumstances.

Along with MDPV and mephedrone, there are 29 other substances that Schumer’s bill bans, including 20 substances in synthetic marijuana and 9 synthetic hallucinogens.

Teensavers applauds Senator Schumer for pushing this bill to the President’s desk.

Only time will tell to see if the law is effective in ridding stores of these harmful products.

 

 

 

The Arizona news website Azfamily.com is taking a closer look at four recent arrests in the Phoenix area, where the four men arrested were busted in the buff.

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Authorities have found one common link; all four men used either PCP, Meth or Bath Salts prior to their bizarre behavior. One of those men died in custody.

This isn’t a surprise. But the increased use of bath salts and similar synthetic substances probably have the producers of “Cops” and “Jail” salivating.

The chemicals in those synthetic products typically make users feel like their internal organs are on fire, which is why they disrobe. Of course the difference between the typical streaker and a guy on bath salts could be the erratic behavior, profuse sweating, and possible foaming at the mouth.

Parents need to discuss these substances with their kids, and alert them to the dangers of them. If the country was seeing a spike in Angel Dust or PCP use, parents would likely be warning their kids repeatedly about the dangers.

The government cannot keep up with the creation, distribution, or sale of these products. Small local law enforcement agencies make busts, but other store owners continue to sell them.

Don’t let your child slip into using these substances.   Parents need to pick up where the government comes up short.

 

How familiar are you with the bath salts craze?

The number of bath salts related illnesses treated in the emergency room has skyrocketed from 300 in 2010 to more than 6000 in 2011.

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The data comes from the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

Many people have only recently heard of the synthetic drugs after the Causeway Cannibal attack.

The drug is traditionally made from a combination of of three drugs – Mephedrone, 3,4 methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Methylone.

Users of bath salts, which can be injected, snorted, inhaled or swallowed, oftentimes report sever paranoia, hallucinations, psychosis, violence and a lack of physical pain.

Temporary bans have been created to stop the sale of the products, but chemists are altering the chemical compounds to continue to sell the materials.

However, whenever any of the drugs in the mixture becomes outlawed in a state or by the federal government, producers simply replace said chemical with a similar one.

The so-call Causeway Cannibal created a new genre of news; “the bath salts files.”   New stations and police are reporting more incidents involving these synthetic drugs.

Two new bath salts related stories hit the air this week. One story was in Miami, the other in New York. It’s clear by reading the comments, that many people still do not know what bath salts are.

Many people think they are the same substances poured into bath tubs. They are not.

For the Miami story, click HERE.

For the New York story, click HERE.

These synthetic drugs have been putting people’s lives in danger for quite some time, but the face eating attack in Miami has brought much-needed attention to the problem.

Hopefully parents read up on these substances and talk with their kids. These substances are not a safe alternative to marijuana, but keep in mind that some parents are unbelieveably allowing their kids to smoke marijuana just to keep them off these substances.

Parents need to have a zero tolerance when it comes to underage drinking and drug use.

This morning making the daily round of news, I saw this story out of Miami about a homeless man who growled at an officer, bit his hand, and acted similar to the so-called South Beach Cannibal.

I guess we will see a huge spike in these news stories, since the face eating attack horrified, yet captivated Americans.

Talk to anyone in law enforcement, or watch the hit TV shows “Cops” or “Jail.” Heck, you could even go back to an episode or two of “Adam 12” from the late 60s to know that they’ve been attacked and have struggled with violent drug users for decades.

But now that people in the media are just starting to find out about bath salts, spice, incense, and all the other synthetic drugs on the streets, it appears we will start seeing more about these types of stories.

Apparently officers in the Miami area have been alerted to a potential danger from homeless people, and they should be using caution on patrols.

Have the homeless switched from two dollar 40 ounce beers to $25 synthetic drugs?

I guess the one thing we can hope for our of these stories is that the federal government will not only extend its ban on the products, but apply some heavy penalties for sales, distribution, and possession of the drugs.

Since the so-called zombie attack in Florida last week people have been scouring the internet looking to read up on bath salts.

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The drugs, a chemical combination, disguised as everyday products, can be lethal.

What are bath salts: Here is a quick synopsis from WebMD:

Citing an “imminent threat to public safety,” the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) made illegal the possession and sale of three of the chemicals commonly used to make bath salts — the synthetic stimulants mephedrone, MDPV, and methylone. The ban, issued in October 2011, is effective for at least a year. During that time, the agency will decide whether a permanent ban is warranted.

Of course, we know that the creators of these products continually change the chemical contents to get around the ban.

We also know that marking them “not intended for human consumption” is exactly what a drug seeker is looking for. It absolves the creators from responsibility, and it alerts drug users to their toxicity.

So since the attacks, every body has jumped online to read what bath salts are. Good, right? Well originally, it probably was a good thing, especially when it comes to parents who’ve never heard of these products. They are popular, and they are dangerous. And kids love them.

But now, it appears we’ve gone from an awareness period, to a period of curiosity. Are kids looking these things up because they want to feel those effects? We’ve seen new agencies from Fox News to Forbes cover the bath salts issue in the week since the face-eating attack.

But are clean teens or teens who smoke pot, now considering trying these hallucinogenic products?

The latest pieces of video making the rounds is a former addict who was featured on CNN. He not only described what using the products did to him, but CNN had footage of the guy mid-high, when he had nearly overdosed.

You can see that right HERE.

Bath salts are a serious problem. And the government has been unable to eliminate them from store shelves at gas stations and head shops.

Now that we’ve made nearly everyone in America aware of what they are, we need to come together to eliminate them, before kids start trying them.  They need to be eliminated, and not just a few hundred packs at a time.

 

CBS Miami now says that the man who police say was eating another man’s face may have been under the influence of bath salts.

The grim crime happened over the weekend. An officer came upon the two men. One of the men was naked and eating the other man’s face. Some say the victim’s face doesn’t resemble anything human.

Bath salts have been known to cause users to hallucinate, but nothing like this gruesome attack has been documented in association with the drugs.

You can read CBS’ story by clicking HERE.

Most people have a stereotype that comes to mind when they think about communities and the types of drugs they use. Some people think marijuana is explosive in more diverse communities, whereas other people believe that big cities leads the way in drugs like heroin, cocaine, and ecstasy. Pill popping? That’s left for old America, right? Wrong!

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A new survey conducted in the middle oh Ohio, an area as hard-working and American as any. It shows exactly what the drug trends are in terms of usage and availability. The survey was answered by law enforcement, treatment experts, and drug users over a 16-county wide map of central-eastern and southern Ohio.

The report shows that heroin and suboxone are on the rise, while for the first time we’ve seen, a decrease in bath salts is seen. Ohio has been one of the leading states to ban bath salts, but as we’ve seen, the producers of the substances continue to skirt laws, and vendors continue to sell them despite the new laws.

Black tar heroin is sharply on the rise over the last 6 months, and the report suggests that the primary age group of users is 18-30. It also shows a new drug trend. Users are giving up on Oxycontin for Opana. Users are able to crush Opana and either snort or inject it, while Oxycontin no longer can be manipulated in that way.

The other highlight was the kids like pills and over the counter medications. Teens have easy access to the pills, and they prefer the high thinking it is safer because it is “medicine.” In what may not be a surprise at all, kids can get their hands on marijuana and cocaine at any time, most often picking it up at school.

In some communities, heroin is easier to get than marijuana. The drug survey shows age and substance range. You can see the information in the graphic below.

 

If you are a parent of pre-teen or teen and you haven’t heard of spice, bath salts, ivory wave, or K2, you better start doing your homework. Here’s a quick cliff’s notes version of what they are, and why they are still here.

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Those products go by many names, but they all have one thing in common; they are synthetic marijuana.

Synthetic marijuana is designed to be a substitute for the real thing, but carry the same psychoaltering effects. The real problem is that they are far more dangerous than the real thing, and some kids have no fear using the products.

These synthetic cannabanoids are sold as incense, potpourri, or bath salts. They are clearly marked, “not for human consumption.” But don’t be fooled. That warning is really an advertisement for teens. The message really states, “if you smoke this, you’re going to get really high.”

Despite numerous attempts to criminalize and ban the products, the creators have been very, well, creative in getting around those bans. State and federal lawmakers have tried banning the chemical combinations, but the manufacturers continue to tweak the formula to escape the ban.

The mind-altering effects come from the chemical compound, which is sprayed onto the products. Essentially it doesn’t matter what the originating product is, once it is coated in the chemical solution, it acts as a powerful drugs. You could go pull some dandelions from your backyard, and if they are dipped in the right solution, smoking them would mimic the effects of pot.

So why are these products to dangerous? Well they are a toxic mixture of chemicals, and they can create numerous symptoms in teens. They can be hard to diagnose. One of the leading theories, though never fully confirmed, was that Demi Moore was smoking this type of product when she had her 9-1-1 episode.

Convulsions, sweating, and hallucinations are just some of the side-effects. A recent story in the USA Today quoted Joanna Cohen, an emergency medicine physician at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington. DC. It cited her writings in Pediatrics, that ER doctors have been having a very hard time detecting the use in kids.

Where there is concern is that parents are the first to argue that they could “tell if THEIR child is on drugs.” This is a fallacy that too many parents believe. They often do not notice any kind of drug use until the user is addicted.

But parents can educate themselves about the warning signs. They can also visit their pediatrician and discuss the possibility that their teen has been using these synthetics. As Cohen reminds in the USA Today article, the long term effects include memory loss and psychosis.