Tag Archive: Alprazolam


According to TMZ.com, so-called Octomom, Nadya Suleman has checked herself into rehab at Chapman House Rehab in Orange.

The celebrity website says that the pseudo-celebrity checked herself in over the weekend, entering a 30-day program. She says she has become dependent on anti-anxiety drug Xanax, which she began taking to “deal with stress.”

“Nadya wanted to get off the Xanax she was prescribed by her doctor and learn to deal with her stress, exhaustion and anxiety with professional help with a team of doctors,” her rep told TMZ. “Nadya wanted to deal with her issues and make sure she is the best mother she can be.”

As with all patients admitted into rehab, their identity cannot be discussed.

Chapman Rehab is run by a team of specialists, led by America’s Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman.

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Three Delaware teenagers are hospitalized in critical condition after ingesting a large number of prescription pills and over-the-counter medications.

The girls called 9-1-1 saying they had popped pills.

The pills consumed include Tylenol, Xanax, used to treat for anxiety and panic disorders; Zoloft, used to treat depression and panic attacks; codeine, a pain reliever; and another medication used to treat Parkinson’s disease.

It’s scary when kids take pills like it is candy. Luckily, one of these teens was able to call for help.

Parents need to remember to lock up all medications, and talk to their kids about the dangers of drugs.

Just because pills are legal, does not mean that they are safe to take without a doctor’s oversight.

An investigation ended in the arrest of a man authorities say ran a major pill ring in New York state.

They also arrested four associates.

Authorities say that Michael Mancusi and his girlfriend had $84,000 worth of medications, including 5,890 tablets of oxycodone, approximately 1,170 tablets of Xanax, and approximately 205 fentanyl transdermal patches.

COULD YOUR TEEN BE EXPERIMENTING WITH DRUGS THIS SUMMER? DON’T GUESS. THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT IS AN ALLY TO PARENTS. CLICK HERE TO MAKE SURE YOUR KIDS START THE SCHOOL YEAR DRUG-FREE WITH THE HELP OF THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.

The drugs sold for anywhere from $5 to $30 per pill or patch

So How did they get the drugs in the first place?

The AG’s office says that Mancusi was in two doctors offices, and made claims for no-fault insurance benefits and obtained Medicaid, Social Security Disability Insurance and Medicare benefits.

At that point, the office says he went doctor shopping, accumulating thousands of pills in a short time.

The arrest removes these pills out of the hands of addicts across the state, and keeps them from falling into first time teen experimenters.

More than 2,500 kids try prescription drugs for the first time every day, and these types of operations can be the source of these pills. Teensavers also reminds parents that unlocked medicines in the home are an open invitation for experimentation.

Hollywood’s celebrity circles certainly has it share of drug users.

Is Macauly Culkin one of them?

Today, a tabloid report is being circulated by legitimate news sources that the actor has a severe drug problem.

Anonymous sources say that the actor has nearly overdosed on his habit of heroin and oxycontin.

The National Enquirer reports that Culkin spends $6000 a month on drugs.

Hopefully these reports are bogus, like a lot of the material that these tabloids post.

Culkin has led an interesting life. After hitting it big with the Home Alone movies, and a dramatic appearance in “My Girl” Culkin has most stayed away from the silver screen.

Culkin has had some publicized drug problems in the past. According to Wikipedia:

On September 17, 2004, Culkin was arrested in Oklahoma City for the possession of 17.3 grams (0.61 oz) of marijuana and two controlled substances, 16.5 milligrams (0.25 grains) of Alprazolam and 32 milligrams (0.5 gr) of Clonazepam,[25] for which Culkin was briefly jailed but soon released on a $4,000 bond.[26][27] After being arraigned in court for misdemeanor drug offenses, he pleaded not guilty at the trial (October 15, 2004 to June 9, 2005), then later reversed the plea to guilty.

Culkin lives in New York and lives out of the spotlight. Many have attributed Culkin’s gaunt figure to drug use, but the actor certainly hasn’t discussed the public speculation.

Move over Jason.

The frightening image of a hockey goalie mask wearing serial killer is out.

The image of a well dressed, average American drug dealing teen is in.

The scariest thing parents should be worrying about on these Friday the 13ths is what their teen may be using when it comes to illegal substances.

Teen drug use is up. This week in New York, an 18-year old died of an apparent Xanax related overdose. Toxicology reports won’t be ready for days. And at Northern Florida University, students there were arrested for using and possessing marijuana and ecstasy.

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The kids aren’t afraid anymore. They aren’t afraid of using. They aren’t afraid of buying and selling. Drugs are readily available on college, high school, and many times middle school campuses.

In this day and age, we need to worry less about the Boogeyman, and more about the “friend” of our children who is trying to hook them on drugs. He has traded in his hooded robe and sickle for a hoody and hash pipe.

When kids make the jump to alcohol and drugs, they typically do it with a close friend or relative. They get the feeling as if they are in a safe environment, with safe people. In their skewed logic, that makes the drugs safer.

But young people that have died from drug use weren’t necessarily junkies with bad grades, coming from bad homes. Most often, these victims are good kids that made bad choices. Many of these victims are strong academically, athletically, and socially. It takes one bad experience with drugs to take a life.

Kids don’t wait around for Halloween to get high, and their frequent and bold drug use could create more than just one Nightmare on Elm Street for their parents. Any Friday at all can be scary, as teens head out to party, gather, and loiter to drink and do drugs.

This is the time when parents need to be superheroes to their kids by talking to them about the dangers of drugs. These parents can also ask a lot of questions about friends, events, and whereabouts. Ultimately, the best super power available to these superhero parents can be a home drug test.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to see the warning signs. Catch experimentation before it becomes addiction.

Quick reference for parents on the 5 popular prescription drugs that teens are abusing.

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The problem: Teens popping more pills than past generations. Pain relievers are currently the most abused type of prescription drugs by 12-17-year-olds,
followed by stimulants, tranquilizers and sedatives. (NSDUH, 2006) Pill parties are becoming more prevalent in communities, and teens are raiding the family medicine cabinet to score their stash. When the supply runs dry, kids turn to heroin.

The pills:

Vicodin: Vicodin contains a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone. Hydrocodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of hydrocodone. Vicodin is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Past-year use of Vicodin is high among 8th, 10th and 12th graders, with nearly one in 10 high school seniors using it in the past year. (MTF, 2006)

Oxycodone:

Oxycodone is a narcotic pain reliever similar to morphine. Oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Oxycodone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Teens typically break up the pills to eliminate the time-release effects.

In 2006, past-year abuse of OxyContin among 8th graders exactly doubled—increasing 100 percent over the last four years (from 1.3% in 2002 to 2.6% in 2006). In 10th graders, past-year abuse of OxyContin increased by 26 percent (from 3.0% in 2002, to 3.8% in 2006). (MTF, 2006)

Alprazolam:

Alprazolam belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. It works by slowing down the movement of chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. This results in a reduction in nervous tension (anxiety). Alprazolam is used to treat anxiety disorders, panic disorders, and anxiety caused by depression. This is Xanax.

Alprazolam overdosing can result in symptoms like confusion, coma, impaired coordination, sleepiness and impaired reaction time. Especially when combined with alcohol, Alprazolam can be fatal. Alprazolam may encourage suicidal thoughts.

Lorazapam:

Lorazepam is in a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. Lorazepam is used to treat anxiety disorders.

However, used chronically, benzodiazepines can be addicting. These agents are often taken in combination with other drugs of abuse by patients with addiction disorders.

Percocet:

Percocet contains a combination of acetaminophen and oxycodone. Oxycodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of oxycodone. Percocet is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Percocet is physically and emotionally addictive. Percocet acts as a block to pain receptors in the brain, which results in a feeling of euphoria. Over time, a patient will build up a tolerance to the medication. Addiction occurs from patients attempting and failing to recreate that feeling. When the prescribed amount no longer produces the desired feeling, patients begin ingesting larger quantities of the medications.

The Solution:

12-panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit:

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit detects Opiates, Oxycodone, benzodiazepines, methadone, marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, methamphetamine, ecstasy, PCP, barbiturates, and tricyclic-antidepressants.

Don’t guess. Home drug test your teen with the latest test approved by the FDA for over the counter sales. It’s the test designed for families by a family company.

 

It still comes as a shock, when a known long-time drug user dies.   Whitney Houston is no exception.   While the singing legend had spent the last several years in relative obscurity, her known battle with drug addiction not hidden at all.   The pop star was trying to make a comeback, and died just a day before the Grammy awards.   Immediately the rumors started spreading as to why she died.   Officially, we won’t know until the coroner releases that information.    There was speculation that her death was caused by drugs and alcohol, and other speculation that she might have drowned.

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Photos taken late last week show Houston looking confused and full of emotion outside a nightclub.   There was obvious speculation as to her degree of intoxication.    Houston set the recording industry by fire.   Discovered by Clive Davis, Houston rocketed to the top of the charts with hit after hit.    Kids these days may not be familiar with much of Houston’s music, most of her most recent work had not fared well.    But Houston was adored by her fans.   Millions are mourning her loss.

Whitney Houston’s death may offer uncomfortable parents an “in” on the drug conversation with their children.   If they are typically uncomfortable talking about drug use with their teenagers, parents can use this tragedy to discuss the dangers.   Whether Houston’s death is connected to prescription drugs or not, her history of drug abuse, and the fact that she had several different medications in her hotel room are strong reasons why parents should discuss the topic with their children.

Among the topics:

  • Painkillers are severely addictive.  Opiates are very difficult to ween off of, and the detox period can be very brutal.
  • Taking pills meant for someone else can have deadly results.   A 13-year old 80 lb teenaged girl taking medicine for a long time, male, 225lb, chronic pain sufferer can be overwhelming.
  • Just because you’ve taken a Xanax or Oxycontin before, doesn’t mean it was the same strength as the pill you will take next time.
  • Pill use can evolve into heroin use in a blink of an eye.   Heroin is easier to get, and it’s cheaper than most painkillers.

Parents need to encourage their kids to talk to them about drugs in the community, and drugs at school.   You want your child to be open with you regarding drugs and alcohol.

Another good option is to talk about home drug testing with your teen.   Parents can say, “I don’t want you to end up like Whitney Houston, Amy Winehouse, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, or Janis Joplin.  I want to drug test you so that we know you stay on the right path.”

The 12-Panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits covers the most popular drug combinations, including opiates, marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, PCP, and many others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your average American likely pictures a drug deal in this likely scenario: two cars of people meeting under the cover of darkness, on a rarely traveled road exchanging cash for a bag of stash.    

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That might have been how deals went down years ago, but the DEA has just made an arrest that could reveal that you may have seen a drug deal or two happen right in front of your eyes.

DEA agents arrested an Irvine doctor, on accusations that he supplied numerous fraudulent prescriptions for people out of Southern California Starbucks cafes almost nightly.

If you live in Orange County, it’s quite possible that your evening tea or coffee run at the chain may have coincided with pill addicts getting their fix.       Baristas even had a hand in helping agents arrest Alvin Ming-Czech Yee, 43, of Mission Viejo.   Their witness testimony helped agents track the alleged actions of Yee. 

And he wasn’t just helping aching seniors alleviate some pain.   People came from all over to get these pills, flying in from places like Detroit, Seattle, and Phoenix.   The lead agent revealed that a third of these patients were under the age of 25.  

Yee is accused of handing out prescriptions for Oxycontin, Xanax, Vicodin, Adderal, and Suboxone.   These are among the strongest opiates on the street.   According to the LA Times, Yee wrote so many of these invalid prescriptions, that local pharmacies started catching on and refused to fill them.

It’s one thing for a junky to deal with an allegedly shady doctor to get his 100 pill fix of a strong opiate.    But let’s assume that these buyers were not all addicts.   These pills are big business.   They can fetch as much as $40 a piece.    That’s $4000 worth of supply to a dealer who can sell to children.

Bogus prescriptions is big business.  Kids are trying pills left and right.   2,500 children try drugs for the first time every day.   Talk to your kids about the dangers of prescription drugs, and dispose of any unused pills in the home.  This is National Drug Take Back weekend.   Saturday, thousands of community events across the country will be held from 10a-2p to collect these pills.   Utilize them.

 

 

 

 

The Teensavers Team often warns parents about the growing problem
regarding teens stealing pills from the medicine cabinet.   While these
adolescent opiate addictions can often start at home, there are other
ways teens get pills.

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A
teen may not start pilfering pills until first being exposed to the
medications elsewhere.  Perhaps they got a Xanax or Oxycontin from a
friend.   Adults with good intentions are not always the source of the
rising prescription abuse problems.

Case in point: A 71 year-old
Orange County doctor, with two practices in Los Angeles is expected to
plead guilty today to charges of prescribing unnecessary narcotics.
Prosecutors allege that Nazzar Al-Bussam wrote 60,000 prescriptions over
a four year span.   At the minimum, there are typically 20 pills per
prescription.   That’s means from 2007-2010, this doctor put 1.2 million
pills on the streets.

Those pills end up somewhere.   They’re
not ingested solely by 47-year-olds.   The pills filter their way into
the hands of adolescents.   It is good that the government is cracking
down on doctors who are writing fraudulent pills.   Parents can do all
they can to lock up pills, but when dealers are getting their hands on
hundreds of thousands of pills, the problem will still be there.

 

 

A new study SAMHSA study shines a light on the rising abuse of pills specifically Benzodiazepines.

Benzodiazepines
are a class of central nervous system depressant drugs that are
commonly prescribed for anxiety, insomnia, and seizure disorders.1
They were introduced in the late 1950s to replace barbiturates and
other drugs that often had unwanted side effects, including a high
addiction potential. It was not until almost 30 years later that the
potential of benzodiazepines for abuse and dependence was recognized.

Benzodiazepines
are often abused in combination with alcohol or other drugs
(particularly opiates) to enhance or lengthen the high provided by the
other substances or to offset their adverse effects. However, the abuse of benzodiazepines in combination with other substances can have severe and sometimes fatal consequences.

While
the 10 year growth of usage seems small, the indicators that more
people are being treated for abusing the pills is alarming.

America’s
Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman, says the report is consistent with what
he’s seeing in his patients.  “With the rise in the marijuana culture
because of medicinal marijuana, parents have focused on marijuana
usage.   But the real danger, that typically goes unmentioned, are
prescription drugs.   Children have no problem experimenting with pills
like Xanax and Valuium.     Unfortunately, especially when it comes to
the opiates, as soon as the pills run out, users turn to heroin and
other street drugs.”

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(SAMHSA) study found that admissions for treatment of benzodiazepine
abuse among patients 12 and older rose from 22,400 in 1998 to 60,200 a
decade later. Benzodiazepine-related admissions accounted for 3.2
percent of all substance abuse admissions in 2008, compared with 1.3
percent in 1998.

The report also highlights that almost all
benzodiazepine admissions (95 percent) reported abuse of another
substance in addition to abuse of benzodiazepines: 82.1 percent reported
primary abuse of another substance with secondary abuse of
benzodiazepines, and 12.9 percent reported primary abuse of
benzodiazepines with secondary abuse of another substance.

A  comprehensive 12-panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit screens for
Benzodiaepines, along with opiates, marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, PCP,
Amphetamines, Methamphetamine, Barbiturates, Methodone, Oxycodone, and
Tricyclic Antidepressants.