Archive for April, 2012


Whether you are a fan of college sports or not is really not important. If you are a parent, and a parent of an athlete, ESPN has an article today that’s well worth reading. It involves NCAA players and drugs.

KEEP YOUR TEEN ATHLETE IN THE GAME WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT. DON’T LET YOUR TEEN’S EXPERIMENT WITH DRUGS BENCH THEM ON THE SIDELINES. CLICK HERE FOR THE QUICK 5 MINUTE TEST.

Why does this hit home?

Because most parents of athletic children think that their kids care too much about their bodies to do drugs. It’s obvious that’s not the case. Surely everyone remembers Lawrence Taylor’s battle with cocaine, and he was one of the best defensive players in the game. Ricky Williams was once considered one of the best running backs that the NCAA had every seen. He left the NFL and went to play in Canada so he could continue smoking pot. Only after he cleaned up, did he return to the NFL.

ESPN dives into the college drug culture, and shows how even the nation’s best collegiate athletes are not immune to messing around with marijuana or popping prescription drugs.

You can read the story by clicking HERE.

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Drug use at an Exeter New Hampshire high school previous dance has caused the principal to eliminate dances at the school.

DONT GAMBLE ON YOUR TEEN’S BIG NIGHT OUT. HAVE CONFIDENCE BY KEEPING A TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT ON THE COUNTER. IT STARTS WORKING, THE MINUTE YOU SHOW IT TO YOUR TEEN.

The prom is still on, besides that, the kids will have no more dances at Exeter High School. The school’s principal VIctor Sokul just doesn’t believe that school dances are safe anymore.

He cites the school’s previous dance and seven violations for drinking and drug use.

Some current students, and their parents, are outraged by the move.

This is a reminder to parents that proms and other dances are not open invitations for teens to experiment with alcohol and drugs. Many times a parent or relative will supply the alcohol for the teens.

On dance nights, communicate with other parents in the group. Ask your teens questions. Do not allow them to get a limo or hotel. Make sure they are supervised throughout the night.

Most teens use the guise of a school dance for a night of drinking and drug use. They made show up, eat dinner, and snap a photo, then they are gone. They go back to the hotel where they prepartied, and continue fueling their intoxication.

Don’t gamble on your teen’s future.

Empower them with the help of a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit.

Friday morning you can ask your teen if they have heard of 420 day. 420 is April 20th. It’s infamous for massive amounts of marijuana smoking, is celebrated by pot smokers of all ages.

Greet your teen that morning with a Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit, and remind them that you will test them if they think of using. Click on the box to get your kit today!

 

 

 

Myteensavers has new findings this morning regarding the dangers of opioids. This is a press release from COMTEX:

People with an opioid addiction had the highest risk of death when compared with rates for alcohol and other drugs, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

COULD SOMEONE YOU LOVE BE USING OPIOIDS? DON’T LET THEM SPIRAL INTO ADDICTION. CLICK HERE FOR THE BEST PRODUCT TO HELP DETECT A PROBLEM.

For those dependent on opioids, the risk of death was 5.71 times higher than healthy individuals in the population of the same age, gender and race. Those with methamphetamine use disorders were next highest with a 4.67-fold risk, followed by those with addictions to cannabis (3.85), alcohol (3.83) and cocaine (2.96). Alcohol dependence was related to the highest number of deaths overall.

The study, available online in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, is the largest North American study to compare mortality rates among different drug users with the longest follow-up. It tracked records of more than 800,000 individuals hospitalized with drug dependence between 1990 and 2005. Of this group, more than 188,000 died during this period.

The findings mean that if 10 individuals in the general population died, then over the same period there would be 57 deaths among people dependent on opioids, which includes prescription opioids as well as heroin.

“One reason for undertaking this study was to examine whether methamphetamine posed a particular threat to drug users, as it has been called ‘America’s most dangerous drug,'” says CAMH Scientist Dr. Russell Callaghan, who led the study. Globally, methamphetamine and similar stimulants are the second most commonly used class of illicit drugs.

“The risk is high, but opioids are associated with a higher risk. We also wanted to compare mortality risks among several major drugs of abuse, as this comparison hasn’t been done on this scale before.” 

Alcohol dependence affected the highest number of individuals, with 166,482 deaths and 582,771 hospitalizations over the study period. In the methamphetamine group, there were 4,122 deaths out of 74,139 hospitalizations, and for opioids, 12,196 deaths out of 67,104 hospitalizations.

Specific causes of mortality were not examined in this study, so the deaths may not be directly caused by drugs but due to related injuries, infectious disease or unrelated reasons. The researchers are now exploring mortality causes for each drug group, which may also point to reasons why women had a higher risk of death for alcohol, cocaine and opioids than males.

“These are not occasional, recreational drug users, but people who have been hospitalized for drug dependence,” notes co-author Dr. Stephen Kish, Senior Scientist at CAMH.

To calculate mortality rates, Dr. Callaghan and colleagues examined hospital records of all California inpatients with a diagnosis of methamphetamine, alcohol, opioid, cannabis or cocaine-related disorders from 1990-2005. They excluded records with evidence of multiple drug use disorders. The inpatient records were then matched to death records from the California Vital Statistics Database. Rates were adjusted by age, sex and race to the California population in 2000.

“One surprising finding was the high rate of death among cannabis users,” says Dr. Callaghan. “There could be many potential reasons, including the fact that they may have other chronic illnesses such as psychiatric illnesses or AIDS, which can also increase the risk of death.”

The findings point to the importance of brief interventions for people receiving medical care for drug dependence or other related risks such as infectious diseases or injuries, says Dr. Callaghan.

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is Canada’s largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital, as well as one of the world’s leading research centres in the area of addiction and mental health. CAMH combines clinical care, research, education, policy development and health promotion to help transform the lives of people affected by mental health and addiction issues..

CAMH is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto, and is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Centre.

Talking to parents about marijuana, ecstasy, heroin, cocaine, or pills? Make sure you have Teensavers Home Drug Tests available for parents.

We have resources and coupons for your community drug forums and seminars. FDA approved and made in America, the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits are the best tool for parents.

It’s the number that is the universal symbol of marijuana; 420.

By the way, many parents (and most pot smoking teens) do not know the significance of the number. One urban myth has 420 being the number of chemicals in marijuana. If someone tells you that, tell them that they are high.

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From Wikipedia: The earliest use of the term began among a group of teenagers in San Rafael, California in 1971.[2][3] Calling themselves the Waldos, because “their chosen hang-out spot was a wall outside the school,”[4] the group first used the term in connection to a fall 1971 plan to search for an abandoned cannabis crop that they had learned about.[5] The Waldos designated the Louis Pasteur statue on the grounds of San Rafael High School as their meeting place, and 4:20 p.m. as their meeting time.[4] The Waldos referred to this plan with the phrase “4:20 Louis”. Multiple failed attempts to find the crop eventually shortened their phrase to simply “4:20”, which ultimately evolved into a codeword the teens used to mean pot-smoking in general.[5]

Like St Patty’s day for drinkers, April 20th is the celebration of cannabis.

One gathering features thousands of smokers on the campus of the University of Colorado. But university officials have tried everything to thwart the toking in their quad. They used fences and sprinklers to no avail.

This year, according to the CBS-TV affiliate in Denver, the campus is turning to fish fertilizer to try to keep the crowds away. They will spread the fertilizer all over the quad to discourage attendance.

Even threats of ticketing with fines up to $100 isn’t scaring away the estimated 10,000 people expected to show up Friday.

Parents should be vigilant as children will tend to mimic this behavior. Find out where your teen is Friday at 4:20pm.

And for parents who don’t know; there’s a green box to combat the green smoking.

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit detects marijuana. Get one today so that you can have it on hand by the weekend. You may never need to use. It begins to take effect, as soon as you bring it home.

Three moms are determined to spread the message of prescription drug abuse.

ARE YOU A PARENT AND NEED INFORMATION ON THE PILLS KIDS ARE ABUSING? CLICK HaERE TO GET INFORMATION FROM THE TEENSAVERS TEAM.

If you haven’t heard about the films Overtaken and Behind the Orange Curtain, you should not only read up on them, but you should see them..

There is a great article today documenting the work done by Jodi Barber, Christine Brant, and Natalie Costa. You can read about it in Laguna Niguel’s patch by clicking HERE.

They want to stamp out any pill abuse that exists and they want to educate parents who are oblivious to what goes on in our community.

 

A story this morning out of Orlando’s WESH-TV website covers 17 kids who were busted for drinking on a MIDDLE SCHOOL campus.

15 were suspended. The school expelled 2 students.

Apparently one of the kids brought straight alcohol to school in a Gatorade bottle.

The bottle was passed around amongst the students. One parent was mad saying that her daughter didn’t know that the drink her daughter was taking was alcohol.

The comment section was abuzz with comments at the apparent parent’s naivety.

Drinking isn’t a rite of passage, not at 15, 16, 17 or 18. Not at 20. Drinking on campus shows an absolute bold defiance of authority.

It’s amazing how some parents react when their kids make mistakes. Sometimes you need to own up to your mistakes. When you can clearly smell undiluted alcohol before drinking it, there’s no way to mistake it for water.

Move over Jason.

The frightening image of a hockey goalie mask wearing serial killer is out.

The image of a well dressed, average American drug dealing teen is in.

The scariest thing parents should be worrying about on these Friday the 13ths is what their teen may be using when it comes to illegal substances.

Teen drug use is up. This week in New York, an 18-year old died of an apparent Xanax related overdose. Toxicology reports won’t be ready for days. And at Northern Florida University, students there were arrested for using and possessing marijuana and ecstasy.

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The kids aren’t afraid anymore. They aren’t afraid of using. They aren’t afraid of buying and selling. Drugs are readily available on college, high school, and many times middle school campuses.

In this day and age, we need to worry less about the Boogeyman, and more about the “friend” of our children who is trying to hook them on drugs. He has traded in his hooded robe and sickle for a hoody and hash pipe.

When kids make the jump to alcohol and drugs, they typically do it with a close friend or relative. They get the feeling as if they are in a safe environment, with safe people. In their skewed logic, that makes the drugs safer.

But young people that have died from drug use weren’t necessarily junkies with bad grades, coming from bad homes. Most often, these victims are good kids that made bad choices. Many of these victims are strong academically, athletically, and socially. It takes one bad experience with drugs to take a life.

Kids don’t wait around for Halloween to get high, and their frequent and bold drug use could create more than just one Nightmare on Elm Street for their parents. Any Friday at all can be scary, as teens head out to party, gather, and loiter to drink and do drugs.

This is the time when parents need to be superheroes to their kids by talking to them about the dangers of drugs. These parents can also ask a lot of questions about friends, events, and whereabouts. Ultimately, the best super power available to these superhero parents can be a home drug test.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to see the warning signs. Catch experimentation before it becomes addiction.

A community is mourning the loss of an 18-year-old student, who died earlier this week.

Students at Carmel High School observed a moment of silence for student Michael Kastle. According to authorities, the Kent, NY teen may have died of a prescription drug overdose.

MAKE SURE YOUR TEENS KNOW THAT PRESCRIPTION DRUGS CAN KILL. DISCUSS DRUGS WITH YOUR CHILDREN AND HOME DRUG TEST TO ENSURE THEY ARE DRUG-FREE. CLICK HERE FOR THE 5-MINUTE TEST THAT’S MADE FOR YOUR FAMILY.

Two friends had brought him to the emergency room in an unresponsive state, and the LoHud.com news site indicated that investigators were looking at the possibility that Xanax was involved. Investigators are believe that Kastle may have “exhibited signs indicating that he might have taken an excessive dose.”

Kastle’s friends took the boy to the hospital around 9:30 a.m. after they were unable to wake him from his sleep.

Police stressed that any conclusive findings must await toxicology results.

Sheriff Donald Smith called Kastle’s death a “terrible tragedy for the entire community.”

Carmel High School students returned from spring break Tuesday to a moment of silence and brief announcement about Kastle’s death.

Kastle’s obituary also appeared in the Lohud.com:

Michael Walter Kastle, of Carmel, NY, passed away on Sunday, April 8, 2012 a the age of 18. Mike was born on April 1, 1994 in Sleepy Hollow, NY. He lived in Mahopac for six years and in Carmel for the remainder of his life. Mike loved dirt bike riding, cars, and his dog, Buddy. he had a passion and aptitude for mechanics, aspiring to be an auto mechanic after graduating from high school in June. A young man with a big heart, he will be greatly missed by his loving family and many friends.

Mike is survived by his parents, Barbara and Matt Kastle of Carmel and Mahopac, NY, respectively; his brother, Jeff, also of Carmel; Aunt Rhona and cousins, Nathan and Libby Kastle of San Jose, CA; Aunt Suzy Bone of Stamford, CT; Uncle Jim Bone of Altamont, NY; and Aunt Peg, Uncle Tom, and cousins, Sarah and David Bone of Guilderland, NY.

Visitation will be held at Balsamo-Cordovano Funeral Home, 15 Church Street, Carmel, NY 10512. Phone: (845) 225-2144, on Wednesday, April 10 from 5-8pm. Online condolences may be offered in the Book of Memories at www.BalsamoCordovanoFuneralHome.com.

This is a tragic loss for his family and the community.