It’s hard to tell kids that drugs are bad, when drug use is glamorized in movies, TV, and music. Snoop Dog is the musical ambassador for pot for the younger generation, as Willie Nelson continues to inspire baby boomer puffers.

CONCERNED THAT YOUR CHILD HAS TRIED MARIJUANA? DON’T GUESS. THERE’S A SIMPLE TEST THAT GIVE YOU THE ANSWER, PRIVATELY AND ACCURATELY.

Scores of music, movies, and television celebrities have had some pill issues. Whitney Houston appears to be the latest. Heath Ledger also had a dangerous combination of pills in his system. It’s tough when the drug use is glorified constantly.

Most parents already avoid talking to their kids about drugs. They usually figure that the “drugs are bad” message is assumed and of course they rely on programs like D.A.R.E. to make their kids aware about drugs.

But what about the parents who do stress the message at home? What about the proactive parents that monitor the media that their kids watch and listen to? Are they fighting an uphill battle?

So what happens when you have an evangelical, with plenty of airwaves to push his message, comes out endorsing marijuana? Pat Robertson believes that the war on drugs have failed. He believes that taxpayers are paying billions of dollars to support the initiative, and that people are wasting away in jails and prisons unjustly.

This is not exactly a startling revelation. The 81-year-old danced around the decriminalization topic in 2010.

This week, the former presidential candidate told the New York Times, “I really believe we should treat marijuana the way we treat beverage alcohol.” “I’ve never used marijuana and I don’t intend to, but it’s just one of those things that I think: this war on drugs just hasn’t succeeded.”

With a following of millions, how do parents combat Robertson’s message, which is being spread by drug legalization groups across the social media?

How can parents tell their kids marijuana and all other drugs are bad, when an evangelical leader endorses them? Marijuana remains illegal for everyone, except for patients of numerous states’ medical marijuana laws. Once legalized, could the marijuana mindset become something similar to the alcohol mindset? With booze, may kids have the perception that “if it’s good enough for adults, it’s good enough for me.” Of course that thinking contributes to the serious number of binge drinking teens and young adults across college campuses. If legalized, would we have a growing number of potheads in our society?

America’s Parenting Coach, Tim Chapman, a 30-year treatment veteran says the message is simple, “Parents should tell their kids that everyone has an opinion. Some people are brilliant on some subjects but not as informed about others. For example, some Europeans believe that it is acceptable for 10-year-olds to have wine at dinner. Most families do not. That’s why each family should make the decision what’s good for their family, despite what high profile person is saying it. Reinforce your values, and your kids will listen.”

Advertisements