It still comes as a shock, when a known long-time drug user dies.   Whitney Houston is no exception.   While the singing legend had spent the last several years in relative obscurity, her known battle with drug addiction not hidden at all.   The pop star was trying to make a comeback, and died just a day before the Grammy awards.   Immediately the rumors started spreading as to why she died.   Officially, we won’t know until the coroner releases that information.    There was speculation that her death was caused by drugs and alcohol, and other speculation that she might have drowned.

CONCERNED YOUR TEEN MAY HAVE TRIED PRESCRIPTION DRUGS?  YOUR NOSE WON’T KNOW IF THEY’VE BEEN USING PILLS.  HOME DRUG TEST YOUR TEEN WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.   AMAZON.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.    CVS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.   WALGREENS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.

Photos taken late last week show Houston looking confused and full of emotion outside a nightclub.   There was obvious speculation as to her degree of intoxication.    Houston set the recording industry by fire.   Discovered by Clive Davis, Houston rocketed to the top of the charts with hit after hit.    Kids these days may not be familiar with much of Houston’s music, most of her most recent work had not fared well.    But Houston was adored by her fans.   Millions are mourning her loss.

Whitney Houston’s death may offer uncomfortable parents an “in” on the drug conversation with their children.   If they are typically uncomfortable talking about drug use with their teenagers, parents can use this tragedy to discuss the dangers.   Whether Houston’s death is connected to prescription drugs or not, her history of drug abuse, and the fact that she had several different medications in her hotel room are strong reasons why parents should discuss the topic with their children.

Among the topics:

  • Painkillers are severely addictive.  Opiates are very difficult to ween off of, and the detox period can be very brutal.
  • Taking pills meant for someone else can have deadly results.   A 13-year old 80 lb teenaged girl taking medicine for a long time, male, 225lb, chronic pain sufferer can be overwhelming.
  • Just because you’ve taken a Xanax or Oxycontin before, doesn’t mean it was the same strength as the pill you will take next time.
  • Pill use can evolve into heroin use in a blink of an eye.   Heroin is easier to get, and it’s cheaper than most painkillers.

Parents need to encourage their kids to talk to them about drugs in the community, and drugs at school.   You want your child to be open with you regarding drugs and alcohol.

Another good option is to talk about home drug testing with your teen.   Parents can say, “I don’t want you to end up like Whitney Houston, Amy Winehouse, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, or Janis Joplin.  I want to drug test you so that we know you stay on the right path.”

The 12-Panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits covers the most popular drug combinations, including opiates, marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, PCP, and many others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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