Archive for February, 2012


Unclear on which treatment is right for a loved one? Your answer may be found in the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

TOO EARLY FOR TREATMENT BECAUSE YOU AREN’T SURE THERE IS A PROBLEM? CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT.

Their latest brochure with information can be found by clicking this link: http://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/treatmentbrochure_web.pdf

Drug addiction should be taken seriously and all types of drug use should be treated.

Quick reference for parents on the 5 popular prescription drugs that teens are abusing.

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The problem: Teens popping more pills than past generations. Pain relievers are currently the most abused type of prescription drugs by 12-17-year-olds,
followed by stimulants, tranquilizers and sedatives. (NSDUH, 2006) Pill parties are becoming more prevalent in communities, and teens are raiding the family medicine cabinet to score their stash. When the supply runs dry, kids turn to heroin.

The pills:

Vicodin: Vicodin contains a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone. Hydrocodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of hydrocodone. Vicodin is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Past-year use of Vicodin is high among 8th, 10th and 12th graders, with nearly one in 10 high school seniors using it in the past year. (MTF, 2006)

Oxycodone:

Oxycodone is a narcotic pain reliever similar to morphine. Oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Oxycodone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Teens typically break up the pills to eliminate the time-release effects.

In 2006, past-year abuse of OxyContin among 8th graders exactly doubled—increasing 100 percent over the last four years (from 1.3% in 2002 to 2.6% in 2006). In 10th graders, past-year abuse of OxyContin increased by 26 percent (from 3.0% in 2002, to 3.8% in 2006). (MTF, 2006)

Alprazolam:

Alprazolam belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. It works by slowing down the movement of chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. This results in a reduction in nervous tension (anxiety). Alprazolam is used to treat anxiety disorders, panic disorders, and anxiety caused by depression. This is Xanax.

Alprazolam overdosing can result in symptoms like confusion, coma, impaired coordination, sleepiness and impaired reaction time. Especially when combined with alcohol, Alprazolam can be fatal. Alprazolam may encourage suicidal thoughts.

Lorazapam:

Lorazepam is in a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. Lorazepam is used to treat anxiety disorders.

However, used chronically, benzodiazepines can be addicting. These agents are often taken in combination with other drugs of abuse by patients with addiction disorders.

Percocet:

Percocet contains a combination of acetaminophen and oxycodone. Oxycodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of oxycodone. Percocet is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

Percocet is physically and emotionally addictive. Percocet acts as a block to pain receptors in the brain, which results in a feeling of euphoria. Over time, a patient will build up a tolerance to the medication. Addiction occurs from patients attempting and failing to recreate that feeling. When the prescribed amount no longer produces the desired feeling, patients begin ingesting larger quantities of the medications.

The Solution:

12-panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit:

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit detects Opiates, Oxycodone, benzodiazepines, methadone, marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, methamphetamine, ecstasy, PCP, barbiturates, and tricyclic-antidepressants.

Don’t guess. Home drug test your teen with the latest test approved by the FDA for over the counter sales. It’s the test designed for families by a family company.

CVS.com is offering up to 25% off of the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits.

Choosing which test is right for your family may depend on what your concerns may be. If you have a teen smoking marijuana at home, the 1-panel may be the right option for your family. If you are concerned about pill or designer drug use, you may want to choose a more comprehensive test like a 7-panel or 12-panel test.

–To purchase a 1-panel test for marijuana is only $12.74 (regularly $16.99) CLICK HERE

–To purchase a 3-panel test for marijuana, cocaine, and methamphetamine for $16.49 (regularly $21.99) CLICK HERE

–To purchase a 5-panel test that screens for marijuana, cocaine, opiates, methamphetamine, and Oxycodone for $19.49 (regularly $25.99) CLICK HERE

–To purchase a 7-panel test that screens for marijuana, cocaine, opiates, methamphetamine, esctasy, benzodiazepines, and Oxycodone for $22.49 (regularly $29.99) CLICK HERE

–To purchase a 12-panel test that screens for marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, methamphetamine, esctasy, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, methadone, PCP, Tricyclic Antidepressants and Oxycodone for $29.99 (regularly $39.99) CLICK HERE.

The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit and CVS Pharmacy, your trusted source for home health care products.

For whatever reason, that also seems really unexplainable, parents do not or will not talk about drug use with their kids.   Many of them think that the anti-drinking and anti-drug message is implied. 

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We all know that isn’t the case.

Kids probably hear and see a few dozen instances of drinking and drug use being glorified to every one message that reiterates the harm and dangers of drugs.

Kids see drinking and drugs in movies, television shows, and can hear about it in music.   They also hear about it socially.   Monday morning high school chatter typically consists of the weekend high school football game, and which teen had thrown up after a severe night of partying.

High schoolers know who the partiers are.    The drinking, smoking, and drug use is often glamorized by the “popular” teens.    Rappers tout their marijuana use, and  celebrities celebrate their pill addictions.    Despite the fact that drugs have claimed the lives of numerous actors and singers, the drug use is still glamorized.

Kids now have the ability to glamorize it through YouTube pages, FaceBook accounts, blogs, and other social media that allows them to post photos and information anonymously.      Foolishly, some kids even post the photos and video of themselves acting silly drinking too much or using drugs.   Here are just a few winners pulled off of eBay.   (Disclaimer, people seen in the videos below may not be minors — but are being used to show the typical behavior described above)

Chances are the people seen in these videos were 18 or older, but they may not have been 21.    Those kids talking about the one teen’s marijuana use looked to be high schoolers.  

Parents can learn from these videos.   Obviously, when they are posted anonymously, it’s hard to find them.   But checking your teen’s facebook, myspace, or mobile phone for photos or references to drug use could help parents.

Stumbling onto experimentation before it becomes addiction is critical to helping a teen witha drug problem.  

Another way you can detect teen drug use is to use home drug test kits.   The newest test on the market is the Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit. 

The Test is available at through many trusted retailers.       All 5 Teensavers Home Drug Tests, including the 12-panel which detects marijuana, cocaine, PCP, ecstasy, opiates, Benzodiazepines, Barbiturates, Amphetamines, Methamphetamine, Methadone, Oxycodone, and TCA’s are currently on SALE at CVS.com.   The 5 teests can also be bought at Amazon.com,  and the Drugstore.com.   Walgreens customers can get 1-panel 3-panel 7-panel or 12-panel tests at Walgreens.com.

The Government is providing a new tool for parents to learn about synthetic drugs.

CONCERNED YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE USED OTHER DRUGS LIKE MARIJUANA, COCAINE, ECSTASY, OR POPULAR PAIN RELIEVERS LIKE XANAX, PERCOCET, AND OXYCONTIN? CLICK HERE FOR THE SIMPLE AND PRIVATE FIVE TEST THAT GIVES YOU ANSWERS IN JUST MINUTES.

The new information is the result of several conferences with White House Drug Policy Director Kerlikowske and public health and safety officials.

The information kit includes a slidecast about synthetic drugs, a corresponding podcast and video and a printable guide “so parents can present details on what to look for, what the street names are and what the effects of these substances are to others in their community,” officials said in a release.

The kit is available at The Partnership at Drugfree.org.

“Synthetic drugs like Spice, K2, and ‘bath salts’ are a serious threat to the health and safety of young people throughout America,” Kerlikowske said in the statement.

The statement said synthetic drugs are often marketed as legal, and are sometimes labeled “herbal incense” or “bath salts” and sold in small pouches or packets over the Internet, in tobacco and smoke shops, drug paraphernalia shops, gas stations and convenience stores.

In December, the National Institute on Drug Abuse said one in nine high school seniors had used “Spice” or “K2” over the past year. That made synthetic marijuana the second most frequently used illicit drug, after marijuana, among high school seniors.

A drug raid at a college campus isn’t really much of a surprise.   But seeing kids caught with a cornucopia of drugs at Texas Christian University may open a few eyes.

CONCERNED YOUR COLLEGE STUDENT MAY BE USING DRUGS WHILE OFF AT SCHOOL?   DON’T LET THEM PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH THEIR LIFE.  CLICK HERE FOR THE QUICK FIVE MINUTE TEST TO DETERMINE IF THEY’VE USED DRUGS.

The bust happened Wednesday morning at campus, and all of the people arrested are current students at the school.

The busts were the result of a six month operation in which those arrested sold drugs to undercover narcotics officers.

“There is no doubt, all of those arrested today, are drug dealers,” said Steve McGee, TCU Chief of Police.

McGee also revealed that the investigation began after his department received tips from students and parents.

“This shows that TCU students, staff and the community will not tolerate this kind of behavior on the TCU campus,” said McGee.

McGee said those arrested were selling marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy in both powder and pill form, LSD and prescription drugs including Xanax, hydrocodone and other opiates similar to Oxycontin.

Some of those arrested were players on the TCU football team.   This serves as a reminder to parents that students with good grades or star athletes can become drug abusers.

You can bet that most of these kids didn’t just pick this habit up when they went off to college.   Some of them started at a younger age.    This is the time for parents to realize how much work is needed to help keep their kids drug free.

It’s as simple as conversation and home drug testing.   The Teensavers Home Drug Test Kit 12-panel drug test can detect many popular drug choices.

You can learn more about the Teensavers Home Drug Test by clicking HERE.  The Teensavers Home Drug Test is sold online at CVS.com, Walgreens.com, Drugstore.com, and Amazon.com.

A 12 panel test screens for the following drugs:

  • marijuana
  • pcp
  • cocaine
  • opiates
  • Amphetamines
  • Methamphetamine
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Ecstasy (MDMA)
  • Methadone
  • Oxycodone
  • Tricyclic Antidepressants

Illinois’ Stevenson High in Lincolnshire has made dubious headlines for a drug bust involving students.   But the sheer volume of people involved is just as alarming in the lack of support parents are showing the school.      An investigation spanned several months, and it involved confiscating cell phones.   That provided detectives with electronic drug deals conducted during school hours.   While it appears very little to no physical drug exchanges took place on campus,  the investigation ended in the arrests of two students.  It appears dozens more students were suspended as a result of the investigation.

So where was the parent outrage?

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It appears there was no outrage at a school board meeting on Monday night, where WGN-TV reported that only two parents showed up.    For a school of 4,000 students, with dozens suspended, just two parents bothered to find out what was going on.  This was the first public meeting where parents could hear the details and findings of the investigation.    Were there private meetings between school officials and the parents of those suspended?    Possibly.  It’s pretty clear that the parents of the two arrested students probably had a good face to face with detectives.

It appears that the “not my kid” mindset has reared its ugly head.   You know.  You tell parents that 9 out of 10 kids will do something bad once in their lives, and they respond, “not my kid!”   Well I guess those parents at Stevenson High are getting a reality check.     The truth is 4,000 kids try drugs every day for the first time.   Some of these kids are as young as 8-years-old.   And among those 4,000 kids, 2,500 of them abuse prescription drugs.   That’s 2,500 kids who may be fueling their drug habit for free via the family medicine cabinet.   Understand that mom and dad?   You are your child’s drug dealer.    Your denial is enabling their habit.     Refusing to discuss drugs with your children is a big mistake.   And you really could head things off at the pass by using home drug tests.

Parents need to stay informed, and two people showing up out of 4,000 students is ridiculous.   How long are we going to bury our heads in the sand?  How long can we ignore this problem?  Kids like marijuana.  Kids like pills.  Kids are using designer drugs.   Kids are using synthetic drugs.   This is real folks.

 

It still comes as a shock, when a known long-time drug user dies.   Whitney Houston is no exception.   While the singing legend had spent the last several years in relative obscurity, her known battle with drug addiction not hidden at all.   The pop star was trying to make a comeback, and died just a day before the Grammy awards.   Immediately the rumors started spreading as to why she died.   Officially, we won’t know until the coroner releases that information.    There was speculation that her death was caused by drugs and alcohol, and other speculation that she might have drowned.

CONCERNED YOUR TEEN MAY HAVE TRIED PRESCRIPTION DRUGS?  YOUR NOSE WON’T KNOW IF THEY’VE BEEN USING PILLS.  HOME DRUG TEST YOUR TEEN WITH THE TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT.   AMAZON.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.    CVS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.   WALGREENS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.

Photos taken late last week show Houston looking confused and full of emotion outside a nightclub.   There was obvious speculation as to her degree of intoxication.    Houston set the recording industry by fire.   Discovered by Clive Davis, Houston rocketed to the top of the charts with hit after hit.    Kids these days may not be familiar with much of Houston’s music, most of her most recent work had not fared well.    But Houston was adored by her fans.   Millions are mourning her loss.

Whitney Houston’s death may offer uncomfortable parents an “in” on the drug conversation with their children.   If they are typically uncomfortable talking about drug use with their teenagers, parents can use this tragedy to discuss the dangers.   Whether Houston’s death is connected to prescription drugs or not, her history of drug abuse, and the fact that she had several different medications in her hotel room are strong reasons why parents should discuss the topic with their children.

Among the topics:

  • Painkillers are severely addictive.  Opiates are very difficult to ween off of, and the detox period can be very brutal.
  • Taking pills meant for someone else can have deadly results.   A 13-year old 80 lb teenaged girl taking medicine for a long time, male, 225lb, chronic pain sufferer can be overwhelming.
  • Just because you’ve taken a Xanax or Oxycontin before, doesn’t mean it was the same strength as the pill you will take next time.
  • Pill use can evolve into heroin use in a blink of an eye.   Heroin is easier to get, and it’s cheaper than most painkillers.

Parents need to encourage their kids to talk to them about drugs in the community, and drugs at school.   You want your child to be open with you regarding drugs and alcohol.

Another good option is to talk about home drug testing with your teen.   Parents can say, “I don’t want you to end up like Whitney Houston, Amy Winehouse, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, or Janis Joplin.  I want to drug test you so that we know you stay on the right path.”

The 12-Panel Teensavers Home Drug Test Kits covers the most popular drug combinations, including opiates, marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, PCP, and many others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A compelling and controversial story out of Mlive.com this morning. It is raising the eyebrows of some parents and the ACLU. The plan involves paying high schoolers $50 to rat out their classmates who are using drugs.

DON’T LEAVE IT UP TO ANOTHER TEEN. HAVE PEACE OF MIND THAT YOUR TEEN IS DRUG FREE WITH THE HELP OF A TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KIT. CVS.COM SHOPPERS CLICK HERE. WALGREENS.COM CUSTOMERS CLICK HERE.

What do you think? Is this a good plan? Will this lead to numerous false accusations? Will this put “tattle-tale” teens in a position to be retaliated against?

One one hand, it seems like this would hold teens accountable to their peers. But it just may not be the right answer for the school.

Parents should be taking more responsibility and talking to their teens about the dangers of drugs. This conversation should be open and honest, and should be frequent between parents and kids.

Parents should also consider having a home drug test kit on hand at home, just in case that first warning sign appears. Marijuana is readily accessible to children and teens now get their hands on pills, high powered opiates, from the family medicine cabinet. Don’t fuel your teens habit with unattended pills at home.

Apsen, Colorado is most known for fun on the slopes.

But there was a new past time that disturbed one father. Drug dealing.

CONCERNED YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE PURCHASED DRUGS FOR SOMEONE? DON’T GUESS. HOME DRUG TEST. CLICK HERE FOR TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS.

When he found that his 17-year-old daughter was buying and using drugs, he notified police about the man he claimed sold her the drugs.

The anonymous letter captured officers’ attention, and they went to work investigating the alleged dealer. There were no arrests for a while, but coincidentally when they were busting another suspected dealer, they noticed Thomas Simmons on the surveillance video. Officers say that he was trying to conceal drugs that were being tossed by then target Max Puder.

That was enough for officers to obtain a tampering warrant. When they searched his car and home, officers fond “multiple types of drugs, paraphernalia, and money. The drugs recovered included Ecstasy, cocaine, psilocybin mushrooms, and approximately 5 grams of other drugs were collected as evidence.”

It all goes back to the father that wrote that note. His letter may not have resulted in an immediate arrest, but he put Simmons on the officers’ radar. And eventually, they were able to bust him.

This is an example of a pro-active parent who refused to stand back and let drugs poison the teens in his community. If you need information about the kinds of drugs in your neighborhood, or perhaps the slang names kids are using to talk about them right under your nose, click HERE.