There are several myths when it comes to teens and drugs.

SOMETIMES JUST HAVING A HOME DRUG TEST IN THE HOUSE CAN INSPIRE KIDS TO TELL THEIR FRIENDS “I CAN’T TRY DRUGS.  MY PARENTS TEST ME.”   CLICK HERE FOR TEENSAVERS HOME DRUG TEST KITS.

Myth #1: NOT MY KID!

You don’t have to be in the treatment and recovery field to have heard this phrase uttered a few dozen times by parents.    It’s pretty common knowledge that parents simply do not believe that their child could ever do drugs.     Truth is, nobody’s child is 100% safe.    It takes not only strong values from the child, but it also takes repeated reinforcement from parents.

Myth #2: I COULD TELL IF MY SON OR DAUGHTER WAS USING DRUGS!

We all have some sort of visual of what a junkie looks like.   And despite never wanting to see any of our children in that state, we pretty much have a picture of what a ragged junked-out version of our kids would resemble.    Of course if your once healthy teen now appears thin, pale, and weak, a parent might speculate that there is something more than diet that is the issue.    But drug detection is mostly invisible to the naked eye.  Sure, there are some signs to look for.   But a parent is typically not a treatment professional.   And the occasional user may not reveal any long-term signs of abuse.    Typically, a parent will only notice drug use, when it has become habitual, or abusive.    They have a much better chance of finding their child’s stash of substances, than detecting that their child may be abusing something.

Myth #2: I KNOW WHAT DRUGGIES LOOK LIKE: DISHEVELED LOSERS!

Not exactly.   There is no poster child for drug abuse.   Teen drug use is not confined to kids from a certain ethnicity, community, or social upbringing.   There are no social barriers for teen drug use.   They are not always the outcasts at school, suffering from bad grades, and completely unsocial.    We are seeing straight A students, star athletes, social butterflies on campus all falling victim to drug abuse.     Drug abuse is not a problem solely with the lower classes.   And it isn’t a problem solely in high society circles.   Kids abuse drugs for many reason.  They could be enjoying drugs recreationaly, or taking them to cope with stress.   They key isn’t why they are using, it is how to stop them from using.

You can tell when you read online stories from major TV and newspaper media outlets just how disillusioned society is about teen drug use.

Many people will make ignorant comments, not knowing anything about these victims.   That’s exactly what they are, victims.

The latest victim was Glen Berlin Parrish.   He’s the 18-year-old who was found dead at UCLA on Sunday morning.   Parents and the boy’s family speculate that the teen may have mixed alcohol with prescription drugs.   An autopsy will help determine the toxicology results.

The father, Glen Parrish, told the Contra Costa Times that “there were a lot of drugs taken and a lot of drinking” at the party attended by his son.

Heartbreaking words from the elder Parrish, as he told the Times, “he was an amazing child with a huge bright future – 3.9 grade point average. And he’s gone.”

While police investigate what exactly happened at the party, what the boy took, and how he got his hands on potentially lethal narcotics, the family is left planning a funeral for a kid who had just gotten a job, was a stellar student, and a former football player.

There’s no such thing as a good child or a bad child.   There isn’t one “I gotta keep my eye on.”  Parents often single out the one child in the family who may consider doing drugs.    Instead parents should focus on drug testing all of their children, to make sure this doesn’t happen to any of their loved ones.

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